REMEMBERING NORMAN AND PATIENCE_ENGLISH

 

 

Three Sages at Spigolizzi

Three sages at Spigolizzi: Norman, Patience and Bernard Hickey

by Aldo Magagnino

In Remembering Man, Norman wrote that everybody talks about art: historians, philosophers, teachers, psychologists, auctioneers, critics and archaeologists. Surely, he continued, artists also have got “something to say about ART. Maybe, but their contribution to the discussion could be minimal. Turner is reputed to have said that art was ‘a funny business’. Artists are usually very busy and when they are not at work, the last thing they want is to talk shop.” After all, either you produce art or you stand watching in admiration and wonder. “Meraviglia tutela” (“Wonder protects”) was a saying he would often repeat to remind us that only our ability to be amazed by the wonders of nature and man could save human kind from brutalization and precocious extinction.

Norman Mommens was born in Antwerp, Belgium, on May 31, 1922 (his father was Flemish and his mother was English) and he died at Spigolizzi, Salve (Lecce – Apulia – Italy) on February 8, 2000. Art was his daily occupation, the physical and mental effort to give body and substance to his visions, weaving colours and lines on canvas and papers and quarrying out soft forms, like “rising matter” from the cold Carrara marble, the Salentino tufo, or the stone of England, Catalonia or Greece. Norman had studied at the School of Architecture and Visual Arts of Amsterdam with H. Th. Wijdeveld, but the World War II and two years of forced labours during the German occupation of Belgium prevented him from continuing his studies. During those years he developed a passion for drawing, probably inherited from his father, an engineer at the Kromhout car factory (the manufacturer of the famous Minerva car), later acquired by the British Leyland. When in the 1980s Norman decided to buy a new Land Rover, the car dealer asked him whether he wanted a special optional device, some servo control. At first Norman was perplexed, considering it an unnecessary cost, but then he remembered that his father had worked to develop that kind of device and decided to have it included.

In 1949 Norman moved to Britain and decided to devote himself to sculpture, but drawing would accompany all his creative life, especially during the last ten years, when his drawings became an essential part of his intellectual activity and meditation. In England, he married Ursula Darwin, a great-great-granddaughter of Charles Darwin. Ursula was also a descendant of Josiah Wedgewood, the founder of the world known ceramics factories, and she would become a celebrated ceramist herself. Maybe, before deciding to become a sculptor, for a short period Norman cultivated the idea of working at the potter’s wheel. But the “Man of Stone”, as Pietro Verri used to call him, could not elude his destiny. Stone had already cast its spell on him. Ursula and Norman split up after a few years, but they remained in contact for the rest of their life, though, as one friend said, Ursula never forgave Patience for taking Norman away from her. For the rest of his life, Norman would also be a great admirer of Charles Darwin and his writings. From a certain point of view, much of his meditation was inspired by Darwin’s evolutionary theories. Ursula was a friend of Leonard Woolf, the great English essayist and writer, one of the leading personalities of the London intellectual circle known as the “Bloomsbury Group”, and the husband of Virginia Stephen, better known as Virginia Woolf. It was through Ursula that Norman met Leonard, who commissioned him the “Goliath”, a marble statue for the garden of Monk’s House, the country residence that Leonard and Virginia had bought in Rodmell, East Sussex. The statute is still there.

GOLIATH - MONK'S HOUSE - SUSSEX

Norman 2

For Norman, work was essentially joy, inner and outer joy. The outer joy was plain. You could tell it at a glance, just looking at him while he was drawing or carving, or while he was absorbed in the act of working out elaborate calculations to produce geometric creations using a pair of compasses, or silently filling dozens of pages with a minute and ordered handwriting. I have seen some black and white old photographs of him, with hammer and chisel in his hands in front of a block of raw marble. His face is always relaxed and a light seems to shine in his eyes, as if he is already anticipating the joy of drawing another creation out of amorphous matter. He sold many statues and drawings that now distill his joy in so many corners of the world. Artists have to live, too. But it was not for money that he worked and, after all, his lifestyle was of a “Franciscan simplicity” as our common friend Bernard Bickey used to say.

Il girdino di Spigolizzi

Each one of his creations was, actually, a tribute and a contribution to the beauty of the Earth. And to the Earth, exploited and raped on a daily basis, Norman tried to hand back beauty and inspirational capacity. And he managed to do it. You only had to look at Spigolizzi, and not only at the carvings that tells of his art around and inside the “masseria”. Even his way of tending the land was a sign of the joy that art can create. I have photographs of the field in front of the farmstead, just across the road, taken from the top of the “tower”. The plants of legumes and vegetables were bedded in concentric circles around the great stone “Fool”, gentle round lines in all the shades of green that seemed to draw a great spiral, reminding those that were so dear to Patience Gray, the kindred spirit he had met in London in the fifties and who would share forty years of her life with him.

Campo Spigolizzi

For thirty years Norman and Patience were the enthusiastic lovers and guardians of the maquis, the Mediterranean “macchia”, and of the remains of the ancient civilization of Salento, of the poetic beauty of mastic trees and “sarsaparilla”, the creeper known as Smilax aspera that that often appears on the bronze age pottery produced by the Messapians, the Salentino Bronze Age ancestors. Patience had developed a unique ability to detect fragments and tiny tools of Neolithic flint. Her collection of arrow heads would be the envy of every museum. Norman had created a cartoon, signing it with the pseudonym of Nimbo. The character was a Salentino lizard, “Coppula Tisa”, inviting, with barbed irony, the Salentinos to awaken and  take action against the disasters caused by the criminal greed of a few and by the callousness and the conspiracy of silence of so many.

Il lago di pietra

Work was joy for Patience, too, in her room overlooking the “stone lake”, where she was always busy creating jewelry or writing articles for British or American newspapers or working for hours on the manuscript of one of her books, some of which are now international bestsellers. She was born in Shackleford, in Surrey, not far from London, on October 31, 1917, the daughter of Olive and Herman Stanham. Her maternal grandfather, Johann Warschawski, was a Polish rabbi who had fled to England during the 1861 pogroms. It was Herman’s father who decided to change his Polish family name into Stanham, before entering the British Army, in a mounted artillery regiment. Patience started to travel when she was still very young. At sixteen she was in Germany to study German and Economics, though she favoured art and history. In 1938 she and her sister Tania, who would later become a talented photographer, travelled to Romania. There, Patience wrote her first article, for a Romanian newspaper, on the occasion of the death of Queen Maria of Romania. The director of the paper became infatuated with her and started courting her, flooding her room with flowers, whose penetrating perfume made her sick. To elude her too persistent suitor, she and Tania fled to Balcic, on the Black Sea, on a four-seat monoplane flown by a Romanian prince.

patience_gray

Patience loved to say, recalling Gertrude Stein, “I write for myself and strangers.” We, the strangers, are glad she did it. For those who have at home a copy of Honey from a Weed, her book of Mediterranean cookery and culture, of  “ritual fasting and culinary feasting in Tuscany, Catalonia, the Cyclades and Apulia,” even preparing a simple dish of chickpeas is a life experience, an immersion into a world of peasant wisdom and civilization that Patience’s book contributed to keep alive for future generations. When Patience had to choose a title for the volume, Norman suggested a verse by William Cowper, “They whom Truth and Beauty lead/Can gather Honey from a Weed”. The book, splendidly illustrated by Corinna Sargood and published by Prospect Books in 1987. As Patience wrote,

“A vein of marble runs through this book. Marble determined where, how and among who we lived, always in primitive conditions … The Sculptor’s appetite for marble precipitated us out of modern life into the company of marble artisans and wine growers in Carrara and into an isolated community of ‘Bronze Age’ farmers in Naxos.  The friendship of a Catalan sculptor and his wife and the incitement of a golden stone in a Roman quarry near Vendrell revealed – a summer long – the frugal and festive aspects of Catalan life. The recipes in this book accumulated during this marble odyssey in the ‘60s, and went on accumulating when in 1970 we settled in the vaulted workspaces of a ruined ship farm in the Salentine peninsula.”

A couple of years later MacMillan published a paperback edition of the book but Patience never liked it (“the margins of pages were too narrow”). Today, Prospect Books still publish Honey from a Weed, in the original hardback edition and also in paperback.

honey from a weed

Honey from a Weed also saved my life (as well as my daughter Alessandra’s). After the sudden and premature death of my wife I found myself charged with the need to feed myself and a nine year old girl. I remember serving her horrible things to eat (which the little angel always said they were good!) though I tried to experiment the recipes provided by some friend or colleague. But when a few years later I met Patience and she gave me a copy of Honey from a Weed, the quality of our food prodigiously improved, to the supreme wonder of friends and relatives. I even learned to give advice about how to cook a chicken or fish or legumes. Patience often laughed when she heard me talking with neophyte enthusiasm.

However, before Honey from a Weed, Patience had published another fundamental book for British women (and not only British), who were busy working and, at the same time, had the responsibility of a family. In 1957 Penguin had published Plats du Jour, a French title for a book which soon became a classic all over the Anglo-Saxon world. Written by Patience in collaboration with Primrose Boyd, and illustrated by their friend David Gentleman, Plats du Jour is an extraordinary collection of inexpensive recipes of pasta, rice, soups, fish, meat, all of them a main course that could feed a family and help out of her predicament a woman who had to divide her time between house and work. But the aim of the work was also another one.

“In this book I have tried to set down the recipes for a number of dishes of foreign origin, in the belief that English people may be stimulated to interpret them, and in doing so find fresh inspiration in the kitchen.”

Plats du Jour

For thirty years, in the quiet of the Spigolizzi farmstead, the life of Patience and Norman was marked by the different occupations dictated by the passing of seasons: ploughing, seeding, the olive harvest, the great celebration of the wine harvest, when all their friends would come and help producing the new wine, working in the candle lit “palmento”, the room where the tank for the treading and the fermentation of must is traditionally located in Southern Italy farmsteads. At the same time Norman continued to cultivate his art in the studio, also finding the time and energy to exhibit his works. Some memorable exhibitions were held in Matera, at La Scaletta (“Materia Sorgente”, 1989) in Casarano , at Palazzo D’Elia (“Costellazioni, Terra e Pietre”, 1986, and “Crocevia”, 1992  and in Cambridge, Broughton House, 1991).

In the meantime, Patience kept chiselling words in her room, a cigarette perennially lit between her index and middle finger, bent on her Olivetti 22, which sometimes I would take to Gallipoli for repairs or maintenance, leaving her my Olivetti 32. This daily routine was sometimes interrupted by the arrival of friends and visitors from all corners of the world, Americans, English, Germans, Swedish in addition to Italians and local people. Often, round the kitchen table conversations would interlace in two or three different languages. Because, Norman and Patience were polyglot and could speak perfectly Italian, English and German and, with various degrees of fluency Spanish, French and Catalan. Norman also spoke Flemish.

Conversation with Norman and Patience was engaging. Norman had developed a fascinating series of philosophical and anthropological analysis, only partially included in Remembering Man (Edizioni Levante Arti Grafiche, Presicce 1991); the rest was left in the form of notes and were never published. He was convinced that the problem of fighting poverty and finding an answer to the needs of mankind has little to do with technological progress.

“The conferences, seminars and media coverage that wage our war on want and greed leave us with the uneasy feeling of having perfected our ballistics, only to be supplied with blank shots. Machines and money can no more save us from poison and poverty than improved meteorology can save the farmer’s fortunes from the vagaries of the market. The solutions offered are technical and financial; nothing happens because the problem is cultural.”

That is why, he concluded, it is necessary to “remember man”, that is to allow the resurfacing of specific traits of humanity, joining

“First and last things, fear and joy, mutually tempered by wonder, finding essence of things and seeking above all, not ‘The Truth’ but truthfulness. He [Man] himself is the most shining manifestation of Creative Imagination, a perfect embodiment of its power to qualify all things while retaining its essentially unqualifiable nature. He is, in this sense indeed, made in the image of his Creator”

Remembering Man

I loved listening to Patience when she recounted to me her life in England in the fifties, in London, a city that was not very different yet from the one I had known at the beginning of the ‘70s, before everything changed, before the corner shops disappeared, and so the spice shops in Soho, the bottle of milk in front on the doorstep every morning and the ubiquitous red telephone booth. Sometimes, overcoming her natural reserve, I could convince her to tell me about the people she had met and one evening I discovered that she had met the great T. S. Eliot at a cocktail party in a country mansion in Sussex, a few years after the war. Patience described her conversation with the poet in “Meeting Mr. Eliot”, one of the pieces she kept writing over the years, the “fascicoli”, often inspired by episodes in the daily life at Spigolizzi. She will later include a selection of these pieces in Work Adventure Childhood Dreams (Leucasia Edizioni, Presicce 1999). In Summer 1994, during one of the many afternoons we spent chatting under the giant fig tree in her garden, she showed me a tiny little book, Fred Uhlman’s A Moroccan Diary, published by Penguin in 1949. She told me about her friendship with Uhlman, dating back to the early fifties. Once, when she and her two children were staying at the same hotel in Wales with Fred and his wife, Patience decided to take the kids on an excursion in the mountains. While they were away a storm suddenly broke and Fred ran to rescue them, bringing the trio safely back to the hotel.

Immagine

In January 1995, Patience edited and published a private reprint of  Uhlman’s Moroccan diary, at her own expense, to commemorate her friend on the tenth anniversary of his death. I translated the booklet and sent the translation and a copy of the English edition edited by Patience to the Italian publisher Guanda. A few months later the general manager of Guanda phoned to tell me that they had published Uhlman’s Moroccan diary in Italian (Marocco, Guanda, Parma 1996), but that it was not my translation. Because of some hitch, on the editor’s table only the English version of the book had arrived and they had hired one of their translators for the job. Later, someone had fished back my translation, which was good but … too late. He was very sorry, and so was I, but then he asked me: “Would you translate something else for us?” So, a translation never published brought me good fortune anyway and was the real start of my career as a literary translator. Patience was overjoyed.

Work Adventures Childhood

Patience often repeated that living on the margins of the world does not mean living on the margins of civilization. From this perspective, she was a forerunner of the best cultural globalization. In many lecture halls never passed so much culture as it passed on the kitchen table of Spigolizzi. International radio and TV journalists came down to interview her. On the web, on the fourth radio channel of the BBC, it is still possible to listen to one of these interviews.

Patience died at 88, after a short illness, on March 10, 2005. A few months later The Centaur’s Kitchen was published by Prospect Books, edited and illustrated by Patience’s daughter, Miranda Gray. It is the first edition of a small volume that Patience had written many years earlier and it has a very particular genesis. In 1964, the Blue Funnel Line shipping company, whose ship Centaur travelled back and forth from Singapore to Western Australia, carrying goods and passengers, asked the writer, at the time already famous for her bestseller Plats du Jour, to write a manual, more than a simple recipe book, that could be used by the Chinese cook on the ship to prepare meals for the crew and the average two hundred passengers travelling on each crossing. The recipes have been recovered and beautifully illustrated by Miranda Gray. The result is a fine volume, a feast of colours (and taste!) for gourmands and a posthumous homage to a great lady.

Centaur's Kitchen

I am indebted to Patience also for the discovery, or rediscovery maybe, of Greece. She and Norman spent one year on the Island of Naxos around the half of the sixties. On the Aegean island, Norman carved the local marble, while Patience wrote, collected recipes from the local peasant women and, of course, cooked. Sometimes she would “start something off in a large black pot on a driftwood fire, then Norman and I go and bathe. In June the sea is empty, rough or smooth, and the beach is ours.”

Their house, outside of Apollona, was a “double cube … on the marble cobbled edge of the bay… At first sight it is difficult to distinguish between a house, a stable and a store.” Norman and Patience soon made friends with the peasants living or working near them. Ringdoves and Snakes (Macmillan, London 1988) was born out of this experience.

Ringdoves

Patience recounts the idyll with a still wild environment and their involvement in the life of the island. But she also describes the darker side, which sometimes emerges, suddenly and threatening, when you happen to live in a place and among a culture you cannot penetrate completely, the “snake” always lurking. In the end they were forced to leave. They never understood what had happened, their behaviour, their habits may have aroused suspicions or they might inadvertently have done something or seen something. They never knew. Of course, when they decided to leave, or to flee from, Naxos, they took with them the statues that Norman had carved and, both in Apollona, before boarding the ferry to Athens and before leaving Athens for Venice, they had to sweat blood before obtaining all the authorizations and permissions and stamps required by the Greek Byzantine bureaucracy and by the Greek ministry of cultural heritage. The officers at the customs needed a certification that the carvings were Norman’s work and not another stealing of the masterpieces of ancient Greece. When in the end everything was settled, thanks to the intervention of a Greek lady friend, while they “swept on board with the ‘exonerated’ carvings glinting on a luggage trolley, someone in the crowd of onlooking Greeks, furiously called out: ‘Look! There go the Treasures of Greece!’”.

Patience also lent me a few books about Greece to read. Among the others there were The Flight of Icaros, by Kevin Andrews, Greek Myths, by Robert Graves and, last but not the least, Prospero’s Cell, in which Lawrence Durrell narrated his own life in Corfu, with his beautiful young wife Nancy Isobel Myers, between 1935 and 1939. Later I returned the books, but then I bought all of them at Waterstone’s in London. I particularly loved Durrell’s book, and when several years later I visited Corfu I went to see the house where the couple lived bohemian style down Kalami, by the seaside, now a sort of a museum with a “kafeneion” and was delighted to sit on the veranda, sipping a cup of coffee while scribbling a few notes.

Kalami, Durrell's house

I also went for a swim in the little inlet by the lovely St. Arsenius shrine, where Lawrence and Nancy used to bathe naked. Sometimes, Lawrence would throw cherries in the crystal clear water, which went down “to the sandy floor where they loom like drops of blood. Nancy has been going in for them like an otter and bringing them up in her lips.”

 

St. Arsenius Chapel, Corfu

Norman was utterly convinced that every single thing, every work of art, every object, created with love and joy could incorporate these qualities and return them in time. “They are spores,” he would say, “Quiescent spores. Sooner or later they will be able to accomplish their mission.” That is why, sometimes, he would give away his creations, or he would sell them at a nominal price. That is why he planted some of his works of art in places known only to him. I know that there is a little statue planted on the rocky shores in the Orkney Islands. Sometimes, on the façade of the houses of Salentino peasants there is a niche lodging the statue of a saint to whom they are particularly devout. In Presicce, one of these niches host the statue of St. Anthony, that Norman surrendered in return of a demijohn of wine. Another niche host a statue of St. Vitus. As a payment, Norman accepted a five-litre demijohn of olive oil.

But Norman’s gifts also had a symbolic value. He once gave me a nice statue of “Lecce stone”, on a base of “Mater Gratiae” tufo.

One evening I had gone to see them and, as usual, Patience asked me to stay for dinner. But, that evening, Norman was sad and Patience, always eager to talk, was strangely silent. Their friend Arno, a German Jew who lived in a nearby farmstead with his British wife Helen Ashbee, was dying of cancer. He was already in his eighties and had fled to Spain during the Holocaust and then migrated to Uruguay. But Norman was particularly sad because he had the impression that Arno could not die yet, not without something that he seemed to be waiting for, maybe. Not that Arno was conscious of it, he was quite confused most of the time and had difficulties to speak at times. But Norman had the impression that he was lingering in his suffering, as if he were not yet ready to depart. “Maybe he should talk to someone of his religion – he said – maybe a rabbi”. “Yes, darling – said Patience in her dark sweet voice – the perennial cigarette burning between her fingers – but where are we to find a rabbi in Salento?” I thought about it, sipping a glass of red wine emanating dark ruby reflections under the Aladdin lamp on the marble-topped table. “I could try – I said – maybe I can find someone in Naples or Rome, where there are large Jewish communities.” Norman and Patience looked at each other, smiling.

SPIGOLIZZI_statues in the lake of stone

In the morning I woke up early and called the telephone company to ask for the phone numbers of the nearest Jewish Community offices, namely in Rome and Naples. The operator told me there was no Jewish community listed in Bari. I tried Naples first, but they took on a bureaucratic approach: they told me that the man was not included in their lists and there was nothing they could do. So I tried Rome. The man at the switchboard listened carefully to my story, then he told me. “Maybe it’s better for you to talk directly to rabbi Elio Toaf. ” I was amazed that it could be so easy to talk to the most eminent member, not only of the Roman Jewish community but of the Italian Jewish community. Elio Toaf was the Italian Chief Rabbi. I had seen his so many times on television, in interviews and in various programmes. I had seen the pictures of his meeting with Pope Wojtyla in Rome. He was extraordinarily famous and, of course, extraordinarily busy.

kippah

A few seconds later I heard his voice at the other end: “Hello, I am Elio Toaf.” Simple as that. Has anyone tried to talk to an Italian Catholic Archbishop? I explained once again the case. When I finished, no sound came from the other end, so I said, “Hello, are you still there?” “Yes, – the rabbi answered – I am here. I was just thinking that in a world where bursts of anti-Semitism are still so violent and frequent, it is incredible that there are people who worry and go into so much trouble about the death of an old Jew. I’ll send down one of my rabbis. I’ll pass him your contacts. Thank you so much.”

I could not believe it could be so easy. The following morning I rushed up to Spigolizzi to announce the good news. Norman was so happy and Patience, the grand-daughter of a Polish rabbi migrated to Britain during a pogrom, was thrilled at the idea of receiving a rabbi at Spigolizzi.

Patience

The rabbi arrived early one morning at Brindisi airport and I went to collect him. Of course I did not know the rabbi and I was expecting to see someone wearing a kippah or a black hat or some other item that could help me identify him. But no one of the passengers at the arrivals hall looked like a rabbi to me. I waited until most of them left the airport and when the last five passengers were about to go out on the footpath to queue up for the bus to Lecce, I started going round asking: “Excuse me, are you the rabbi I was waiting for?” From the puzzled faces of the first two gentlemen I understood they had never heard of a rabbi, and a rabbi coming to Salento, of all places. However they were very kind, though they kept exchanging alarmed glances as I proceeded on my quest. The third gentleman was my rabbi. I was so happy, we shook hands and then I took the luggage near the rabbi’s feet and started walking with him towards the glass sliding doors of the exit. But before we got there someone behind us started yelling: “Hey, that’s my luggage!” I froze and when I looked back I saw a man running towards me and two policemen approaching. I explained that the luggage was the rabbi’s and then, overcome by doubt, I asked: “Because you are a rabbi, aren’t you?”. And it was then that the rabbi opened his lips for the second time, to say that, yes, he was my rabbi, but had no luggage. I apologized with the legitimate owner and the policemen for the inconvenience, of course it was a misunderstanding and all that, while the policemen patiently listened, nodding their head, as if to say “don’t you dare do that again in my airport, buddy!”

While driving to Arno’s place, I tried to think up of a plan of action. I had told in advance about the visit of the rabbi to Helen receiving a perplexed look. She was a convinced atheist and was not sure that Arno could talk to the rabbi, or to anyone else for that matter, since his conditions were rapidly deteriorating. And of course, though she did not say it, she considered the whole thing a nonsense. I had to explain the situation to my rabbi, including another fact, a lie actually: I had told Helen that the rabbi was just visiting Salento and, having learned that an old Jew lived here, had asked to visit him. The rabbi was very understanding.

When we got to Arno’s place, Helen received us with cold kindness and led us directly to Arno’s room. Arno was reclining in an armchair, wearing a pair of brown trousers, a shirt and a brown waistcoat.  A light cotton blanket was on his legs, despite the sweltering heat. He was looking tired and emaciated. And the problems began. Arno, who could speak several languages, including German, Italian, French, English and Spanish, had been refusing for days to speak any language but German. I could speak all his languages except German and the rabbi could only speak Italian and French. Helen, who could have helped us in German had disappeared and had clearly no intention of cooperating. We tried to start a conversation in Italian, English, French and Spanish, but only managed to extract a few indistinct words form Arno. But he understood that his visitor was a rabbi and he asked in English “Why aren’t you wearing a kippah, then?” I translated for the rabbi and he he immediately produced his kippah, that he kept neatly folded in his pocket, and put it on his head, saying a few words in Yiddish. Arno’s eyes shone for a moment and he answered in the same language. They kept speaking that ancient language of the Jew, I could not understand a single word, but that was not important. My presence was no longer needed. Silently, I left the room and went out in the garden.

About forty minutes later, my rabbi reappeared, escorted out by Helen. She smiled, shook hands and retreated. I drove the rabbi to Spigolizzi where Patience had prepared a kosher lunch. But the rabbi could not linger, he had some business in Brindisi before departing on an evening flight to Rome. We sat down under the giant fig tree just outside the house for some time and the rabbi said how moving his meeting with Arno had been. They had prayed and sung together and he had left Arno peacefully sleeping. Before we left, Norman managed to slip an envelope into the rabbi’s hands, with an offer for the Jewish community, and a note to thank Chief Rabbi Elio Toaf in Rome.

Under a fierce afternoon sun I drove the rabbi to Brindisi again and then came back to Spigolizzi, where Patience, Norman and I ate the kosher lunch for dinner.

Arno died the day after.

Some German friends criticized the initiative, saying that it was a sort of intrusion into Arno’s life  and an imposition on Helen. They said that the Jews do not have an end-of-the-life rite as the Christians do. Patience listened silently and then placidly answered with her usual enigmatic smile: “But the rabbi has come.”

SPIGOLIZZI 1994 -1

That same evening, after dinner, Norman took me in his studio and presented me with the statue that he called, “the fledgling”, the unfeathered bird still unable to fly away from the nest. The statue represented a human being with sketchy arms and immature forms. I think it was a sort of allegory of what I was like at the time, a human being still a bit amorphous, despite my forty years, as a bird that could not fly yet but was learning, because if I could bring a rabbi to Spigolizzi, maybe there was still hope.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ten years later, when I told him that I wanted to buy one of his “Angels”, Norman smiled and nodded silently, his white hair and beard framing the fine head, in one of his characteristic attitudes that will remain in the hearts of all those who knew him. His “Angels” are among his creations I loved most. Once, in Belgium, during the Second World War, he helped a group of people who were trying to rescue a mother and a little girl trapped under the rubble of a house hit by the bombs. A group of men was supporting a heavy beam while others were digging among the collapsed stones: when they found them, they were both dead. The episode was indelibly impressed in Norman’s mind: those rescuers with their arms high up to support the beam with their hands suggested him the image of angels with their wings folded behind their back and he kept reproducing that vision in countless versions and materials, wood, stone, marble, aluminium.

Over the following weeks he started to fiddle with an old wooden angel he had carved several years earlier and that still preserved shadows of its original coats of paint. He stripped and repainted it in white, red, blue and gold. But I noticed that he was taking the thing a bit too easy. Every time I went to visit him I passed through the studio to see what I already considered “my angel” and Norman would nod and smile, caressing the smooth surface of the little carving. But he did not say anything.

Norman 1

Then, one evening he did something that took my breath away. While we were sipping a glass of the “Spigolizzi wine” with its fruity taste and a hint of myrtle, thyme and rosemary, to accompany a piece of “pecorino” cheese and a few slices of salami, he suddenly offered me his “Fool”, the only copy he had made in bronze, a faithful reproduction of the giant stone Fool dominating the yard of the masseria. It was a unique work of art, priceless, and he proffered it as one would offer a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, saying: “Keep it at home for some time and see if you like to have it there.” I knew from that very moment that I could never part from it. And he knew it as well. So I understood that the Fool would be a precious substitute for my angel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I sometimes wondered why the “Fool” and not the angel. Maybe for Norman I was that Fool at the time, as I had been the fledgling ten years earlier. Actually, I was not really “Fool” yet, but maybe Norman had foreseen that I would be one day. I had not awaken from my slumber yet. The awakening had begun over the years, with so many words eaten and drunk under the fig tree, with the long conversations that now appear to me like a gift “before the end of time”, to quote the title of a fine book by Suzy Gablik that Norman gave me. As Kahlil Gibran’s Fool, I still had to lose masks before the sun could kiss my face.

 

Norman 3

Norman died on February 8, 2000 and it was on the evening of his funeral that I saw it. In the evening, like cats. When I came back home I sat in front of my computer trying to chase off a sense of loss heavy as a boulder. I uncorked a bottle of wine that Norman had given me a couple of months earlier, as a Christmas gift. It was the last wine we had made together. The ruby colour under the lamp on the desk looked even more intense. I tasted the intense flavour, the aftertaste reminiscent of the perfume of the maquis, thinking again of that day, a few months earlier, when we had squashed the grapes and, after leaving them to rest with their juice, we had worked at the winepress for hours, before pouring the must in the casks, closing them with a bunch of  herbs, instead of  a cork. It was at that moment that I saw it.

It was leaning on the bottom of the monitor. It had been waiting there for years. Norman had given it to me to celebrate another Christmas: a small figure painted in soft shades of blue on a little wooden board, with an expression of wonder on the face, a long Modigliani neck and a flowing hair. But now, for the first time, I could see that behind the figure there was something: two wings, piling high like a cascade of feathers which reappeared behind the hair and the back. It was my angel and he had been looking at me for years, and I, the “fool” had not noticed it. Every time that I think to my Guardian Angel, now I know what he looks like. And I know that now Norman is among true angels and I am sure he will find them very similar to the ones he imagined and painted. Patience reached him five years later and now they both rest in the cemetery of Salve, a few metres form one another, in the land they had chosen to continue together, until its earthly conclusion, the true romance of their destiny.

Angelo

 

 

Many thanks to John D M Arnold for editing the English text.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

JAN KEMP: Dante’s Heaven_Italiano

by Aldo Magagnino

janet-riemenschneider-kemp-jan-kemp-dieter-riemenschneider

Ho conosciuto Jan Kemp attorno al 2000, a una conferenza organizzata da Bernard Hickey all’Università del Salento (allora Università di Lecce). Fu un incontro breve, qualcuno ci presentò come accade alle conferenze, ma rapidamente ci perdemmo di vista. Avevo da alcuni anni cominciato la mia attività come traduttore letterario, traducevo racconti saggi e romanzi, ma a quell’epoca mi sarebbero tremati i polsi alla sola idea di tradurre anche poesia. Quando il caso, o il destino, ha fatto in modo che mi sedessi accanto a Jan e suo marito Dieter Riemenschneider, a un’altra conferenza a Lecce tredici dopo, ero forse un po’ più navigato e tentai di tradurre anche una sua poesia, che fu pubblicata sulla rivista online dell’Università di Udine Le Simplegadi, diretta da Antonella Riem e Stefano Mercanti (“Un Jardin Suspendu: to music”, Le Simplegadi, 2013, XI, 11: 47-50. – ISSN 1824-5226 http://all.uniud.it/simplegadi). Un giudizio lusinghiero ricevuto da Stefano Mercanti, mi ha spinto ad accettare il suggerimento di Jan e tentare la traduzione del suo Dante’s Heaven, pubblicato per la prima volta in Nuova Zelanda da Puriri Press nel 2006.

20170213_192213

Buon’avventura con il mio Dante’, mi scrisse Jan nella dedica sul frontespizio del volumetto che mi regalò a Lecce. Ed un’avventura si sono rivelate la lettura e la traduzione di Dante’s Heaven, un’immersione in un mondo antipodeo di colori e suoni esotici, nomi carichi di suggestioni, rimandi letterari giocati tra la cultura neozelandese moderna, che affonda le sue radici nella tradizione classica europea, e il retaggio della cultura maori. Il linguaggio della Kemp è esuberante, e la poetessa mostra una rara capacità di incorporarvi con estrema grazia e naturalezza suoni onomatopeici, neologismi, espressioni in lingue diverse, esiti preziosi della sua esperienza cosmopolita  Per una “espatriata”, una neozelandese europea, come lei stessa si definisce, non sorprende che tra i capisaldi della sua formazione culturale ci siano anche William Shakespeare e, appunto, Dante Alighieri. Nella poesia di Jan Kemp, l’esperienza di vita, il ricordo degli amici e dei maestri, la tradizione culturale europea e quella maori trovano una perfetta sintesi nella visione e nella ricerca lirica personalissima dell’autrice, “si fanno/banco di plankton che si affolla/e monta, enorme risacca d’usi e costumi”, in una “fioritura spettacolare” di versi e immagini . Quella di Jan Kemp si potrebbe definire poesia di riconciliazione, perché in Nuova Zelanda (e perché no, anche nel Mondo), “siamo tutti nuovi arrivati”, come recita il titolo di una delle sue liriche, perché “ora siamo qui tutti insieme/per quante tribù essi, per quanti maori noi/sterminammo a colpi di mere & l’esecuzione di un trattato ”.

20170213_192008

Tradurre Dante’s Heaven, per un traduttore che non è mai stato in Nuova Zelanda, è stato come scoprire un luogo inesplorato, come scivolare lungo l’imbuto capovolto dantesco fino a ritrovarsi con i piedi su “una secca dei Karmadecs”, fino a vedere la terra incognita e le “quattro stelle/non viste mai, fuor ch’a la prima gente”. A momenti ho quasi gridato ‘Terra, laggiù’ come il mitico Kupe o il giovane Nick che per primo avvistò le coste dell’Isola del Nord dalla coffa dell’Endeavour. Così spero sia anche per il lettore italiano. Buon’avventura!

Dante’s Heaven  Il Cielo di Dante di Jan Kemp

(Traduzione a cura di Aldo Magagnino) Edizioni del Poggio, Poggio Imperiale (FG) 2017 (Via V. Veneto 13   71010 Poggio Imperiale, FG) http://www.edizionidelpoggio.it

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

JAN KEMP: Dante’s Heaven

by Aldo Magagnino

 

janet-riemenschneider-kemp-jan-kemp-dieter-riemenschneider

 

I probably met Jan Kemp around the year 2000, at a conference organized by Bernard Hickey at the University of Salento (at the time, University of Lecce). It was a brief meeting, someone introduced us as it is often the case at conferences, but we rapidly lost sight of each other. At that time, I had already begun my activity as a literary translator, I translated short stories, novels, essays, but I would have balked shivering at the very idea of translating poetry. How could I dare? When case, or destiny, brought me to sit beside Jan and her husband Dieter Riemenschneider at another conference in Lecce, at the same university but thirteen years later, I was maybe a little more experienced and I tried to translate one of her poems, which was later published in Le Simplegadi, an online review of the University of Udine, edited by Antonella Riem and Stefano Mercanti (“Un Jardin Suspendu: to music”, Le Simplegadi, 2013, XI, 11: 47-50. – ISSN 1824-5226 (http://all.uniud.it/simplegadi). A flattering opinion expressed by Stefano Mercanti spurred me to accept Jan’s suggestion and to try to translate her Dante’s Heaven, first published in New Zealand by Puriri Press in 2006.

20170213_192213.jpg

Jan Kemp gave me a copy of Dante’s Heaven and she wrote ‘Buon’avventura con il mio Dante’ (‘have a nice adventure with my Dante’) on the title page. And an adventure it was reading and translating it, an immersion into an antipodean world of colours and exotic sounds, names heavy with suggestions, references to New Zealand modern culture, rooted in the European classic tradition, and to the aboriginal Maori culture. Jan Kemp’s use of the language is exuberantly rich and she shows a rare ability to incorporate onomatopoeic sounds, neologisms, expressions in other languages, all precious outcomes of her cosmopolitan experience. For an expatriate, “a NZ European” as she sometimes refers to herself, it is not strange that William Shakespeare and Dante Alighieri are among the foundations of her cultural background. In Jan Kemp’s poetry, her life experience, the memory of her friends and masters, the European and the Maori cultural tradition blend into a perfect synthesis in the poet’s vision and in her original lyric research, “made plankton shoaling through/the incoming whale tide of costumes and custom”, in a “spectacular blossom” of verses and images. Jan Kemp’s poetry is a poetry of reconciliation, because in New Zealand (and all over the World) “we are all newcomers”, to quote the title of one of her poems, because “we are now here together/whatever notes pierced the silence at our births,/whatever tribe they, whatever Maori we/dispatched with mere & the execution of a treaty.”

20170213_192008.jpg

The translation of Dante’s Heaven, for a translator who has never been to New Zealand, has been the discovery of an unexplored land, falling “through earth’s core” like Dante, feet splashing “on a shoal near the Kermadecs”, looking at the “terra incognita” and the “four stars/never seen except by the first people”. I almost shouted “Land Ahoy” like a mythical Kupe or Young Nick who first sighted the coast of the Northern Island from the maintop of the Endeavour. I would wish the same experience to the Italian reader. ‘Buon’avventura’.

Dante’s Heaven Il Cielo di Dante

(Translated and edited by Aldo Magagnino) Edizioni del Poggio, Poggio Imperiale 2017 (Via V. Veneto 13   71010 Poggio Imperiale, FG – Apulia – Italy) http://www.edizionidelpoggio.it

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

DELLA BOMBA

Di Matthew Condon, scrittore e giornalista australiano
(Traduzione di Aldo Magagnino)

 

 

Condon

 

 

Era un uomo anziano, piccolo, seduto da solo sul tram. Era la fine di luglio e faceva caldo. Il tram era diretto verso i sobborghi meridionali di Hiroshima, all’imbarco dei traghetti per l’isola sacra di Miyajima. Il vecchio indossava un grande cappello di tela a falde flosce e un vestito safari beige. Sulle ginocchia cullava una piccola borsa. Mi guardava da quando ero salito, vicino alla Cupola della Bomba Atomica e mi ero seduto di fronte a lui. Il tram si andava svuotando lungo la route 2 e lui continuava a fissarmi attraverso un paio di enormi occhiali dalle spesse lenti.
Di tanto in tanto, guardavo il suo viso dolce e consunto, e mi resi conto che c’era qualcosa di strano. Non era qualcosa che fosse immediatamente evidente, ma appariva curiosamente asimmetrico. L’occhio sinistro era più piccolo del destro e la differenza era amplificata dalle spesse lenti. Anche lo zigomo, sotto l’occhio più piccolo, era piatto, a dispetto dell’altro al di la del setto nasale, che appariva arrotondato e pieno. Dava l’impressione che molto tempo prima il viso avesse subito un incidente e che l’origine di quelle imperfezioni fosse molto lontana, all’orizzonte di una lunga vita.
Ad un certo punto, eravamo rimasti solo noi due sul tram e fu allora che si alzò e si sedette accanto a me. ‘Da dove viene?’ chiese. Aveva una voce sottile e il suo inglese aveva un forte accento, ma era chiaro.
‘Australia,’ dissi, voltandomi verso di lui.
Abbassò lo sguardo sulla borsa che stringeva tra le mani.
‘Lei è un soldato?’
L’insolita domanda mi fece ridere. ‘No,’ risposi.
‘Ricordo i soldati australiani nel 1945,’ disse, ‘con i loro cappelli.’ Piegò all’insù un lato della falda del cappello di tela, improvvisando un tipico cappello floscio australiano. ‘Molto bello,’ disse sorridendo.
Disse che i soldati australiani gli avevano insegnato a parlare inglese a Hiroshima dopo la guerra. Era nato nel 1928 e, da giovane, era stato un ‘uomo di nave.’ Con le mani mimò la presa della ruota di un immaginario timone, come se lo facesse ruotare da sinistra a destra.
Poi, improvvisamente, disse: ‘Sono della bomba atomica.’
Rovistò nella borsa e notai che il tessuto della pelle della mano sinistra era molto liscio, una stranezza che si aggiungeva a quella dell’occhio e dello zigomo. Era un vecchio diviso longitudinalmente a metà. Alla fine estrasse uno spesso libretto blu, delle dimensioni di un passaporto. Avevo letto che i sopravvissuti alla bomba atomica portavano con sé questi libretti. Contenevano la loro storia medica.
‘Sto andando all’ospedale,’ disse, tenendo sollevato il libretto. ‘Ogni settimana vado in ospedale.’

Wilfred Burchett apprese dello sganciamento della bomba atomica mentre era in attesa del pranzo in una cucina da campo dell’esercito americano a Okinawa. Come scrisse nella sua autobiografia At The Barricades: ‘Il 6 agosto 1945, ero in fila per il rancio assieme ad una cinquantina di marine stanchi … la radio gracidava e nessuno ci faceva molta attenzione, come al solito. Il tono eccitato dell’annunciatore mentre l’aiutante cuoco deponeva l’hamburger il purè di patate nel vassoio mi spinse a domandare che novità ci fossero.’
Gli dissero che una “nuova grande bomba” era stata lanciata sui giapponesi. Burchett tese l’orecchio per sentire e apprese della bomba atomica. Scrisse: ‘Presi mentalmente nota che Hiroshima sarebbe stato il mio obiettivo prioritario se mai mi fosse riuscito di arrivare in Giappone.’

 

Hiroshima now

Quindici giorni dopo era bordo della USS Millet che attraccava alla base navale di Yokosuka. La sera prima della partenza per Tokyo da dove avrebbe proseguito per Hiroshima, Henry Keys, un collega giornalista australiano gli diede la sua pistola calibro 45. Accompagnato dal corrispondente americano Bill McGaffin, saltò immediatamente sul primo treno per Tokyo. Stava già pensando a come arrivare a Hiroshima. Apprese che alcuni colleghi erano alloggiati all’Imperial Hotel. Burchett e McGaffin tentarono di avere una stanza al Dai Ichi, ‘l’unico altro albergo rimasto in piedi.’
Un esercito di circa 600 giornalisti attendeva di assistere alla cerimonia della firma della resa a bordo della Missouri il 2 settembre. Ma Burchett guardava alla direzione opposta: Hiroshima. ‘Con l’aiuto del mio frasario [giapponese] riuscii ad arrivare all’agenzia di stampa ufficiale giapponese [a quell’epoca denominata Domei] e scoprii che c’erano ancora treni che andavano là dove una volta c’era stata Hiroshima. Fu una grande sorpresa, poiché a tutti i giornalisti era stato detto che il sistema ferroviario giapponese era fermo … Il viaggio sarebbe stato lungo ed era difficile dire quanto sarebbe durato. Nessuno, mi avvertirono, andava più a Hiroshima.’
Il giorno della resa ufficiale, alle sei di mattina, Burchett era in viaggio verso sud. Alle prime ore del 3 settembre, scendeva dal treno davanti allo scheletro di un edificio, che una volta era la stazione ferroviaria di Hiroshima, ed entrava nella storia.

Il famoso corrispondente estero Murray Sayle, che ha trascorso gran parte della sua vita in Giappone, aveva fatto del suo meglio per prepararmi al viaggio sulle orme di Burchett. Ero stato messo in contatto con lui da un altro grande giornalista Australiano all’estero, Phillip Knightley. In qualche modo, nella mia mente, loro due, assieme a Burchett, formavano una sorta di trittico giornalistico. Sayle in Giappone, Knightley a Londra e nell’Unione Sovietica. Burchett nel Sud-Est Asiatico. Quello che ho imparato è che non ci si può realmente preparare al Giappone.
Mentre ci accingevamo ad atterrare, la vista del Monte Fuji dal finestrino dell’aereo, soffuso di luce rosa, non faceva che accentuare il senso di lontananza. Non sembrava reale. Non era colpa del Monte Fuji, ma era probabilmente la maledizione del viaggio moderno in un’età di immagini e messaggi pubblicitari che si susseguono incessantemente, di bombardamento iconico e di rapina culturale dei più belli e riconosciuti paesaggi del mondo. Incorniciato nella finestra di Perspex, poteva essere scambiato per una cartolina.

 

Hiroshima

Arrivai a Tokyo all’ora di punta del mattino e riuscii a farmi strada fino al mio piccolo, ma pulito, alloggio non lontano dall’Imperial Hotel. Era il Tokyo Family Hotel. Il foyer ricordava stranamente qualcosa che avresti potuto trovare in una località marina inglese: legni scuri e tendine di pizzo e il tavolo della reception ingombro di oggetti. La mia stanza non era diversa dalla stretta cabina di una nave, eppure conteneva tutto ciò che ci si sarebbe aspettati in una sistemazione più costosa, solo in miniatura. Ero in una città grandissima in una stanza piccolissima.
Quella prima mattina, andai a piedi fino all’Imperial Hotel, non l’originale che aveva aperto nel 1890, né la seconda incarnazione fatta di pietra vulcanica e terracotta progettato da Frank Lloyd Wright all’inizio degli anni ’20, ma la terza, un melange di alte torri degli anni ’70 e ’80. Alcuni isolati più lontano c’era il Dai Ichi, ma anche in questo caso nulla che Burchett avrebbe potuto riconoscere. Nel 1945, aveva scritto: ‘Il direttore ci guardò come se fossimo calati dalla luna e ci spiegò che l’albergo era pieno e “non confortevole.”’
Il Dai Ichi, come l’Imperial, ora era ultramoderno e svettava verso il cielo. Con una certa difficoltà chiesi al direttore se avessero una pubblicazione con la storia dell’albergo e dopo molta confusione mi porse, con grande cortesia, una pubblicazione contemporanea che decantava i tanti ottimi servizi dell’albergo.
Al Circolo Giapponese della Stampa Estera mi diedero una tessera valida per u n periodo di un mese e mi offrirono l’uso della biblioteca. C’erano giornalisti da ogni parte del mondo, seduti a leggere i giornali, con quell’aria a metà tra il tranquillo e il vigile che hanno molti giornalisti quando leggono i giornali.
Non era più possibile, tra le svettanti costruzioni moderne, immaginare il mondo ridotto a livello stradale che avevano visto Burchett e i suoi colleghi alla fine della guerra, con gran parte di Tokyo spianata grazie ai bombardamenti dei B-29 del Generale Curtis LeMay. Oppure la bonomia del bar dell’Imperial o i pasti consumati nei residui minuscoli ristoranti, quasi un buco nel muro, del centro della città.

Fungo atomico

Tornai alla mia cabina, svuotato dal jetlag e dal feroce caldo estivo e fui svegliato, inebetito, dalla donna che distribuiva tè fresco nelle stanze tutti i giorni alla stessa ora.
Avevo completamente smarrito il senso del tempo e dello spazio, una sensazione che ho provato molte volte a Tokyo. Era così gigantesca che ero incapace di formarmi una mappa mentale delle sue reali dimensioni. Eppure, contemporaneamente, era così intima, la stanza che sembrava una cabina, le centinaia di semplici cortesie che i cittadini manifestavano, sia per strada che all’interno del Family Hotel, la naturale efficienza con cui tutto avveniva, creavano l’illusione che di trovarsi in una città che avesse un decimo della sua reale estensione.
Era solo la sera, con le folle e le luci e l’inesauribile energia, che l’illusione evaporava e ti rendevi conto di essere in un luogo che non assomigliava a nient’altro sulla terra.
Una settimana dopo, presi posto sulla carrozza 15 del sul treno ad alta velocità Shinkansen Nozomi Super Express diretto ad Hiroshima. Secondo l’orario generale, il viaggio durava quattro ore. In quell’inizio di settembre 1945, Burchett calcolò di aver impiegato tra le venti e le ventiquattro ore per percorrere lo stesso itinerario.

Burchett non era nuovo a viaggiare in condizioni difficili. Durante gli anni della Depressione si era ‘messo in strada’ con un fagotto in cerca di lavoro. Era finito nei pressi di Mildura, dove aveva vissuto per sei mesi ‘sotto un gigantesco eucalipto a Bruce’s Bend,’ un’ampia ansa del fiume Murray’. Scrisse: ‘Ho vissuto di pesca, scambiando il pesce che mi avanzava con farina e sale in un negozio lì vicino e mangiando merluzzo del Murray, pesce gatto e pane azzimo cotto sotto la cenere …’
Burchett riferì che il treno sul quale salì quella mattina a Tokyo alle sei del mattino trasportava soldati dell’Esercito Imperiale Giapponese, alcuni dei quali erano appena stati congedati. Offrì loro sigarette e ricambiarono con sakè e pezzi di pesce secco. Seduti nello scompartimento avevano le spade alla cintura.
Uno dei passeggeri era un prete americano. Aveva l’incarico di istruire i soldati americani su come comportarsi in Giappone nel delicato periodo della resa, per evitare di offendere gli abitanti. Il prete avvertì Burchett che ‘nello scompartimento la situazione era molto tesa e che una mossa falsa poteva costarci la vita. Gli ufficiali erano furiosi e umiliati a causa della sconfitta. Soprattutto, non dovevo sorridere poiché ciò poteva essere scambiato per un segno di maligna soddisfazione per ciò che stava accadendo a bordo della Missouri. Osservando gli ufficiali che ci guardavano torvi e giocherellavano con l’elsa delle spade e i lunghi pugnali da samurai che molti di loro avevano alla cintura, non mi sentivo affatto incline a sorridere, specialmente perché il treno piombava nella completa oscurità quando attraversavamo gallerie che sembravano interminabili.’
Che cosa passava nella mente di Burchett durante quel viaggio interminabile? Pensava alla sicurezza personale ? A come avrebbe fatto, alla fine, a inviare la sua corrispondenza da Hiroshima? Alla bomba atomica?
Sayle suggerì una teoria: ‘A quell’epoca il semplice fatto di andarvi era già un grande scoop in se stesso per …Burchett del Daily Express e dimostrava coraggio e iniziativa: aveva semplicemente comprato il biglietto e c’era andato. Una cosa che i corrispondenti di guerra della generazione successiva fecero di continuo e nemmeno tanto rischiosa come le sue avventure in seguito in Corea o nel Sud-Est Asiatico. Bisogna ricordare che la Seconda Guerra Mondiale era ufficialmente finita e Burchett era accreditato presso la marina americana, il che lo teneva fuori dal campo d’azione della censura dell’esercito. Infatti, Tokyo era stata danneggiata molto più gravemente ed aveva avuto almeno un numero di vittime civili tre volte più alto. Osservate le foto dell’epoca. La bomba atomica era l’ultima meraviglia della scienza militare, quindi Wilf seguì semplicemente il normale fiuto del giornalista per la notizia.’

Orologio Hiroshima

Burchett arrivò a Hiroshima alle 2 del mattino del 3 settembre. Fu trattenuto sotto un fragile riparo da due guardie in divisa nera che non erano convinte delle spiegazioni dello straniero. Esibì perfino la sua macchina da scrivere portatile Hermes, come prova. Fu rilasciato solo dopo che ebbero letto una lettera che recava per il corrispondente della Domei di Hiroshime, Mr Nakamura, il quale arrivò poco dopo. Insieme si incamminarono lungo i binari di un tram ‘verso alcuni palazzi lontani due o tre chilometri’.
‘C’era solo devastazione e distruzione e nient’altro,’ scrisse Burchett. ‘Nuvole grigie come piombo aleggiavano sulla città; dalle fessure nel suolo salivano vapori e c’era un acre odore di zolfo.’ Incontrò ben presto i sopravvissuti alla bomba, afflitti da una malattia che nessuno ancora sapeva come definire. Nella sua memorabile corrispondenza riferì che ‘trenta giorni dopo che la prima bomba atomica aveva distrutto la città e sconvolto il mondo, la gente continuava a morire , in modo misterioso e orribile, gente che durante il cataclisma era stata colpita da un qualcosa di sconosciuto che posso solo descrivere come la peste atomica.’
Da qualche parte, in quella città devastata, c’era un ragazzo di diciassette anni convalescente dalle ferite che aveva riportato sulla parte sinistra del corpo.

La distanza da Tokyo a Hiroshima è più o meno la stessa che c’è tra Sydney e Brisbane. Ma le caratteristiche comuni si fermano qui. La strada ferrata segue lo sperone meridionale e sud-occidentale dell’Isola di Honshu. Una volta superata la vasta conurbazione della stessa Tokyo in direzione di Yokohama, la terra era piatta e intensamente coltivata. Attorno a Nagoya, i campi, le risaie e le coltivazioni di ortaggi si spingevano fin sotto la linea ferroviaria.
A 300 chilometri all’ora, dalle ampie finestre del treno si poteva solo dare un’occhiata superficiale, di sfuggita, al paesaggio. All’interno della carrozza, i passeggeri erano quelli che ogni venerdì si possono incontrare in qualunque altra parte del mondo, uomini d’affari che tornavano da Tokyo, studenti che andavano a trovare genitori e amici il fine settimana. Nello scompartimento c’era un denso fumo di sigarette.
È difficile immaginare se i pensieri di Burchett, in questa fase del viaggio, si erano volti ai campi e ai villaggi che attraversava, agli uomini con i cappelli di paglia che lavoravano nelle risaie, ai fili di fumo che si levavano dai margini dei campi. Il paesaggio, quasi sicuramente, era cambiato molto poco dal allora.
Sul treno rilessi Hiroshima, il famoso resoconto del giornalista americano John Hersey sulla bomba e sulle sue conseguenze, e Hiroshima Notes (Appunti da Hiroshima), dello scrittore giapponese Kenzaburo Oe, il quale scrive: ‘Quando arrivo ad Hiroshima, nell’estate del 1963, il sole è appena sorto. Per le strade non si vedono ancora gli abitanti. Solo qualche viaggiatore qua e là vicino alla stazione ferroviaria. In questa stessa mattina, nell’estate del 1945, molti viaggiatori erano probabilmente appena arrivati a Hiroshima. Persone che erano partite da Hiroshima 18 anni fa saranno ancora vive oggi o domani; ma coloro che due giorni dopo, in quell’agosto del 1945, non avevano ancora lasciato Hiroshima avrebbero avuto il destino umano più tragico e spietato del ventesimo secolo.’
Questo era ciò che veniva in mente di fare al visitatore che arrivava per la prima volta: calcolare le date e le ore, cercare di dare un senso alla logistica del destino e delle circostanze, poiché si faceva fatica a comprendere la vera e concreta logistica dell’esplosione della bomba.
Il treno continuava silenziosamente la sua corsa. Lingue di bosco lambivano i margini della strada ferrata e, superate Kyoto e Okayama, il paesaggio cominciò a cambiare. Le colline avevano ora un aspetto aspro e spettacolare e si susseguivano in fitte pieghe. Iniziò, quindi, l’interminabile serie di gallerie che aveva descritto Burchett. Ne contai 19 prima che il treno riemergesse sulla bassa conca che era la città di Hiroshima. Anche su un treno ad alta velocità, per attraversarne alcune ci volevano fino a due minuti.
Quando il prete americano fu sceso a Kyoto, Burchett rimase l’unico occidentale a bordo e ciò, unito alla sequenza di gallerie, spiega perché egli abbia descritto la sua situazione come ‘più cupa che mai.’ Quelle gallerie erano, d’altronde, un passaggio infernale che lo portavano verso un luogo infernale. Non avrebbe potuto immaginare l’impatto di una bomba atomica su una città . Nessuno, nel corso della storia, aveva mai visto nulla di simile. Ma adesso, attraversando queste gallerie, mi stavo a mia volta immedesimando nella creazione di un racconto, tentando di vedere e di percepire al posto di Burchett, di calarmi nella sua pelle. Anche solo a pensarlo, ci si rende conto che si tratta di un tentativo ridicolo; che si sia separati da mondo e dal proprio personaggio, da una sottile lastra di vetro. In quelle gallerie, sapevo fin troppo bene che non avevo visto Burchett nel 1945 o i soldati imperiali che sonnecchiavano, esausti, cullati dal dondolio del treno, ma solo il riflesso del mio volto.
Era il primo pomeriggio quando scesi dal treno ad alta velocità nella moderna stazione di Hiroshima. Il taxi impiegò dieci minuti per portarmi all’albergo, l’Hiroshima Green, nel centro di quella che avrebbe potuto essere una qualunque altra città del mondo di medie dimensioni, da un milione e centomila abitanti.
Le costrizioni fisiche e mentali di una città densamente popolata come Tokyo era scomparsa. Hiroshima aveva ampi viali fiancheggiati da alberi, una bella rete di fiumi e di ponti ed un nucleo centrale attorno al quale gravitava tutto.

Hiroshima3

Aveva però ciò che nessun’altra città poteva vantare: la Cupola della Bomba Atomica, accanto al Fiume Motoyasu-gawa, dall’altra parte rispetto al Peace Memorial Park. Era implacabile e ossessionante e così profondamente radicato nella coscienza che solo dopo essere rimasto a lungo seduto a guardarlo e fotografarlo mi resi conto che si trattava dei resti di un vero edificio.
Mi registrai presso l’albergo e tornai immediatamente alla Cupola, attirato da essa, come doveva essere accaduto a milioni di visitatori negli ultimi sessant’anni. Rimasi seduto su un muro alle spalle della Cupola, a guardarla, per mezz’ora.
Tornando all’albergo, cercai l’ipocentro della bomba, non lontano dalla Cupola. Era solo a un paio di strade di distanza, segnalato da una piccola targa. Oltre la targa c’era un parcheggio a più piani e, accanto ad esso, l’Hiroshima Green Hotel.

Burchett doveva essere esausto, quando arrivò nel cuore di una Hiroshima devastata seguendo i binari divelti del tram. Descrisse con precisione ciò che vide attorno a sé con uno stile disadorno. Era certamente quella la scrittura di Burchett ma non deve aver avuto alternative di fronte all’impossibilità di capire l’immensità di ciò che vedeva davanti ai suoi occhi. Descrisse ciò che vide a grandi linee, pezzo per pezzo. Non aveva bisogno di fare altro. Tutto ciò che vedeva era nuovo. Nelle sue memorie ricorderà:

Dal terzo piano dei grandi magazzini Fukuoka, guardando in ogni direzione, non si vedeva altro che ettari di terreno piatto, qualche alberello e alcune ciminiere. Tra i pochi edifici sventrati rimasti in piedi vicino ai grandi magazzini, c’era una chiesa. Quando la vidi da vicino mi resi conto che era saltata in aria ed era ritornata, intatta ma di traverso, sulle sue stesse fondamenta.
Anche i ponti di cemento armato erano saltati dai loro piloni, alcune campate erano ricadute sul posto, altre erano precipitate nel fiume … Non c’erano i resti dei muri distrutti, come di solito si vede nelle città bombardate. Era stata una distruzione mediante polverizzazione, seguita da un incendio.
La spiegazione per cui alcuni edifici nel centro fossero rimasti in piedi, secondo la polizia, era che si trovarono esattamente nell’epicentro dell’esplosione, direttamente sotto la bomba che scendeva attaccata al paracadute, in una zona relativamente protetta mentre la forza dell’esplosione si espandeva dall’epicentro.

Ma Burchett non aveva ancora raggiunto l’epicentro della sua esclusiva mondiale, l’orribile centro della storia che fece avere al suo lavoro un impatto globale così forte.
Lo trovò ben presto, quando andò a visitare l’Ospedale delle Comunicazioni alla periferia della città. Là, un mese dopo la bomba, vide persone ‘in vari stadi di disintegrazione fisica.’
‘Un reparto dopo l’altro, erano tutti uguali,’ ricordò Burchett. ‘i pazienti erano terribilmente emaciati ed emanavano un odore nauseabondo che fu sul punto di fermarmi sulla soglia della prima porta. Alcuni avevano ustioni violacee sul viso e sul corpo; altri recavano macchie nero-bluastre sulla pelle del collo, raggrinzita e ricoperta da vesciche.’
I medici implorarono Burchett di trovare scienziati che conoscessero questa ‘malattia’ che venissero in città ad aiutarli. ‘Spiegai che, come giornalista, potevo solo riportare fedelmente ciò che avevo visto e che, nonostante non fossi americano ma solo al seguito delle forze alleate, avrei fatto del mio meglio perché fossero al più presto inviati a Hiroshima scienziati che “sapevano.”’
Non perse tempo nel redigere il suo servizio. Ritornò nel centro della città, si sedette su un blocco di cemento davanti sua macchina da scrivere Hermes e scrisse il suo racconto.
Come il servizio riuscì a passare da Hiroshima a Tokyo e poi ad arrivare nel resto del mondo, per essere pubblicato sul Daily Express il 6 settembre 1945, è un’altra storia drammatica. Il suo collega di Hiroshima, Mr Nakamura, lo spedì parola per parola in codice Morse, per mezzo di un telegrafo manuale, all’ufficio Domei di Tokyo. Fu grazie agli stratagemmi di Nakamura, e di diversi altri giapponesi sconosciuti, che la storia rimbalzò fino a Londra.
Come scrisse Sayle, nel suo pezzo “Did the Bomb End the War?” (“Fu la Bomba a Porre fine alla Guerra?”), pubblicato su The New Yorker nell’agosto 1995, il Generale Douglas MacArthur impose la censura sulla stampa giapponese il 18 settembre. Il codice dei giornalisti bandiva qualunque cosa che potesse “direttamente o mediante illazioni, disturbare la pubblica tranquillità”, o diffondere “critiche false o distruttive nei confronti delle Potenze Alleate.” Gran parte del lavoro della stampa occidentale continuò a passare sotto l’attento esame da parte dei militari.
Il resoconto di Burchett era passato attraverso le maglie grazie al clamore suscitato dalla resa giapponese. Da Hiroshima non sarebbe più uscito nulla per molto tempo.
Al suo ritorno a Tokyo, Burchett prese parte ad una conferenza stampa all’Imperial Hotel, dove uno scienziato delle forze armate spiegò che la malattia che, secondo quanto si riferiva, aveva colpito i sopravvissuti di Hiroshima, non era collegata in alcun modo alla radiazione atomica. Burchett chiese all’ufficiale se fosse stato ad Hiroshima. Era il suo asso nella manica: lui aveva visto tutto direttamente. L’ufficiale non c’era stato. Dopo un breve scambio di battute dissero a Burchett che era ‘caduto vittima della propaganda giapponese.’
In seguito Burchett fu informato che MacArthur aveva ordinato la sua espulsione dal paese per aver violato le regole della “sua” occupazione militare. L’ordine fu ritirato. Burchett ritornò a Londra. A Hiroshima, ormai “post-bomba”, furono inviati soldati australiani. Alcuni di loro insegnarono l’inglese agli abitanti.
Un anno dopo, Hersey visitò Hiroshima e al ritorno scrisse un articolo sulla città, i sopravvissuti e la malattia da radiazioni. Fu pubblicato integralmente su The New Yorker ed ebbe vasta eco in tutto il mondo. Il suo contenuto fu, anche in questo caso, in gran parte negato dalle autorità.

Nonostante il fascino fisico di Hiroshima, la popolazione giovane, il suo vigore, si avverte un peso che vi aleggia intorno. Dopo una settimana, comincia a sentire quel peso, attraversando ripetutamente il Parco della Pace e tornando a visitare il Museo della Pace, girando attorno ma senza mai davvero sfuggire alla forza gravitazionale della Cupola della Bomba Atomica.
L’esperienza era, in parte, viscerale. Visitare Hiroshima in prossimità di agosto, sentire l’umidità persistente, che non dà tregua, vedere quei cieli chiari e celesti era come essere collegato, anche se in maniera remota, a quella mattina del 6 agosto. Il mondo può cambiare, ma il tempo e la qualità della luce possono condurti al di fuori del tempo.
Così deve essere stato anche per loro, gli abitanti di Hiroshima, quel giorno prima delle 8.15 del mattino. Questa doveva essere la luce mentre i bambini uscivano di casa per andare a scuola e gli uomini e le donne andavano al lavoro su quei tram affollati.
A Hiroshima ci sono, però, forze contrastanti in gioco. La città è diventata, naturalmente, un simbolo tragico, delle forze potenzialmente malvagie della tecnologia, degli abissi dell’umanità. Alo stesso tempo, essa reca il bagaglio del futuro, della pace e di un mondo libero dal nucleare.
Questo è ciò che è accaduto a noi, sembra dire. Non fate che accada mai più.
Nel sessantesimo anniversario dello sganciamento di Little Boy, il bambino, come fu soprannominata la bomba, dal portellone dell’Enola Gay, decine di migliaia di giapponesi faranno il loro pellegrinaggio a Hiroshima. Saranno liberate colombe e sui tanti fiumi della città galleggeranno le lanterne. Origami a forma di gru, realizzate dai bambini di tutto il mondo, decoreranno a milioni il Parco della Pace.
Nel mio ultimo giorno a Hiroshima, tornai ripetutamente alla Cupola della Bomba Atomica. Lo fotografai all’alba, a metà mattinata, a mezzogiorno, per tutto il pomeriggio e al crepuscolo. Speravo che la macchina fotografica capisse ciò che stavo cercando, anziché continuare a tentare io stesso.
Mentre mi preparavo a lasciare Tokyo per tornare a casa, The New Yorker pubblicava un servizio che descriveva come gli americani stessero riportando a casa i loro soldati morti in Iraq.

Wilfred Burchett morì nel 1983. Ancora oggi, la sua carriera, i suoi scritti e le sue azioni sono fonte di acceso dibattito e polemica, in particolare i suoi articoli dal Vietnam negli anni sessanta. Negli ultimi anni c’è stato un ritorno di interesse nei suoi confronti e nel suo lavoro. Nel sessantesimo anniversario di Hiroshima, la Melbourne University Press ha pubblicato la versione completa, finora mai apparsa delle memorie di Burchett, At the Barricades. Nick Shimmin, editore e curatore, ha lavorato sul manoscritto, che è il doppio rispetto alla versione di 341 pagine che è stata pubblicata, assieme a George Burchett, artista di Sydney e figlio di Wilfred.
Nell’introduzione che Shimmin ha scritto per il libro si legge: “Wilfred Burchett è stato il più grande giornalista che l’Australia abbia mai prodotto e uno dei migliori corrispondenti esteri che il mondo abbia mai visto. Questa semplice affermazione basterà a suscitare le ire di color che hanno per decenni portato avanti attacchi al vetriolo contro di lui e la sua eredità, ma questo volume dimostra come quest’affermazione sia giustificata e respinge le calunnie che sono state addossate a Burchett nel corso degli ultimi cinquant’anni. Le pagine che seguono furono scritte da Burchett intorno al 1989, poco prima della sua morte. Meno della metà di ciò che scrisse in queste memorie fu pubblicato in At the Barricades nel 1982, ma in quell’occasione i curatori ritennero opportuno rimuovere gran parte di ciò che nel testo era più interessante.
“L’idea di pubblicare il libro nacque due anni fa. Avevo incontrato George, il figlio di Wilfred, quindici anni fa, quando avevo lavorato con lui per l’emittente multiculturale australiana Special Broadcasting Service. Anni di discussioni sullo stato del mondo lasciarono il posto allo sgomento di fronte al comportamento dei governi dopo l’11 settembre, finché un giorno George osservò che gran parte di ciò che stava accadendo gli ricordava molte cose che suo padre aveva descritto, in particolare durante le guerre di Corea e del Vietnam. Il seme era stato gettato.
“Se consideriamo il triste ruolo giocato dai media nel periodo precedente la guerra in Iraq, le sfacciate bugie e gli inganni della “coalizione dei volenterosi” e dei suoi portavoce, forse non è una cattiva idea rivisitare una precedente generazioni di giornalisti “dissidenti” che sfidarono la linea ufficiale e, nel caso di Wilfred, pagarono un prezzo alto. Molti di coloro che lo diffamarono negli ultimi anni della sua carriera scrivono ancora, sempre chiusi dietro ai paraocchi ideologici della Guerra Fredda. Per loro, nonostante la testimonianza di questo libro, tra tante altre, Burchett resterà sempre un nome che provoca un odio irrazionale. Ma chiunque abbia una mente più aperta, un atteggiamento tollerante e un desiderio di verità sarà affascinato e ammirato dalla lettura di questo libro.
Knightley ricordò così il suo primo incontro con Burchett: “A Londra, all’inizio degli anni settanta, stavo lavorando ad un libro sui corrispondenti di guerra (che in seguito fu pubblicato col titolo The First Casualty). Stavo trattando il teatro di guerra del Pacifico durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale e c’era una lunga lista di corrispondenti di guerra che avevo bisogno di intervistare. Wilfred Burchett era il primo della lista. Ma come trovarlo? Alcuni dicevano che viveva a Parigi, altri a Sofia, Mosca o Pechino. Dopo tutto lavorava in vari paesi. Poi una sera andai ad un party a Battersela ed era lì, seduto su una poltrona in un angolo della stanza, un bicchiere in mano, che pontificava sullo stato del mondo, mentre un gruppo di giovani ammiratori sedevano estasiati sul pavimento.”
Alex Mitchell, ex corrispondente di guerra e commentatore politico per un quotidiano di Sydney The Sun-Herald, all’inizio era affascinato dalla leggenda di Burchett. “Lo incontrai l’ultima volta nel 1978 in un bar di Parigi per scoprire che cosa sapesse sull’assassinio del leader bolscevico Leon Trotsky, il fondatore della Quarta Internazionale. Ho una assoluta ammirazione per la sua abilità giornalistica (per il suo modo di praticare la professione nel modo più puro, come nel suo servizio da Hiroshima) e per la tenacia nel ‘scoprire il fatto’ e ‘essere sul posto’ quando stava accadendo. Molti dei suoi libri e dei suoi scritti sono straordinariamente preziosi per la ricerca storica, ma molto del suo lavoro era pura propaganda per le burocrazie di Mosca e di Pechino. Credo di poter ammirare l’uomo e, nello stesso tempo, restare ostile alle sue idee politiche. Il mio disprezzo va principalmente ai parassiti della stampa odierna, che siedono a giudicare Burchett. Nessuno di loro è mai stato da qualche parte o ha mai fatto qualcosa. In confronto, intellettualmente, sono dei nani.”
Il figlio di Burchett mi disse che a casa suo padre non parlò mai della sua esperienza ad Hiroshima. “Non perché evitasse l’argomento,” mi disse, “ma perché la conversazione attorno al tavolo riguardava di solito argomenti di attualità. Quando raccontava storie del passato, erano di solito racconti sulla sua vita di ragazzo di campagna australiano o altre storie divertenti. Stare con Wilfred era molto divertente. Poiché era spesso lontano, avevamo sempre tante cose da raccontarci, prima che ripartisse ancora una volta.
“Senza dubbio, Hiroshima fu il momento cruciale della carriera giornalistica di Burchett. Per Wilfred, Hiroshima segnò numerosi e fondamentali cambiamenti. Fu la fine della ‘guerra buona’ la Seconda Guerra Mondiale e un anteprima di quello che sarebbe stata la Terza Guerra Mondiale. Che si sia ‘disinserito’ dalla muta dei giornalisti al seguito per andare da solo a Hiroshima dà la misura del suo impeccabile istinto professionale. La sua profetica frase: ‘Scrivo tutto questo come monito al mondo,’ dà la misura delle sue capacità di comprendere la portata degli eventi oltre che raccontarli. Il fatto che per il resto della sua vita abbia portato in una gamba i frammenti di una granata giapponese ma abbia continuato a scrivere con compassione delle vittime della bomba, dà la misura della sua umanità
“Burchett è ancora attuale oggi? Ci si può scommettere! Si pensi solo all’Iraq, a tutte le bugie che ci hanno condotti lì e al ruolo compiacente di una certa stampa nel vendere la linea ufficiale.”
Lo scrittore Rodney Hall una volta mi disse che a lui importava poco la ricerca storica quando scriveva un romanzo storico. Che importanza aveva, mi disse, se la ruota di un carro aveva 10 o 12 raggi? Affermava che catturare i sentimenti era più importante dell’accumulo dei dettagli, che era possibile viaggiare nel tempo e condurre i lettori nel passato attraverso l’intuizione, per mezzo del cuore e della mente, senza l’ostacolo di un sottobosco di fatti inutili.
Scrivere una biografia romanzata di qualcuno che è realmente vissuto presenta un enorme quantità e ben radicata di sottobosco. Il sentiero è intralciato dai sentimenti, memorie vere e dibattiti ancora aperti. Ci sono centinaia, forse migliaia, di Wilfred Burchett formati e fissati nella mente di familiari, conoscenti, colleghi. Ci sono i Burchett formati dai contrasti ideologici, basati sulle sue azioni, il suo lavoro e le sue opinioni. Ci sono i documenti dell’ASIO, i servizi segreti australiani, che abbozzano un certo Burchett e le pagine della sua stessa autobiografia che ne produrranno subito un altro.
Anche il mio Burchett sta per uscire alla luce, ma si tratta solo di un disegno a matita all’estremità di un fitto campo. Mi piace pensare che sia libero del bagaglio che ha accumulato nel corso di una vita. Non è una leggenda e non è un traditore. È solo un giovane che segue il suo istinto per raccontare una notizia, forse l’unico racconto puro di una notizia di tutta la sua carriera. Ma come attraversare quel campo?

Quel giorno a Hiroshima, il vecchio giapponese col cappello a falde mosce si alzò lentamente dal sedile mentre il tram si apprestava a fermarsi davanti all’ospedale.
‘Molto piacere di averla incontrata,’ disse e mi strinse la mano.
Forse trattenni quella vecchia mano più a lungo di quanto la cortesia richiedesse. Sorrise, afferrò la borsa e scese sul marciapiede.
Mentre le porte del tram si chiudevano lo osservai fare qualche passo prima di voltarsi di fronte al mio finestrino. Guardai la mano avvolta attorno alla piccola borsa. Avevo stretto quella mano. La mano di uno dei sopravvissuti alla bomba atomica di Hiroshima. Sentii, forse romanticamente, di aver toccato la storia.
Lo guardai dal finestrino e mi venne di pensare al giornalismo, alla storia e perfino alla vita. Solo in rare occasioni vediamo qualcosa che non sia al di là di una lastra di vetro. Il Monte Fuji dal finestrino dell’aereo. La campagna giapponese dal finestrino del treno ad alta velocità. Hiroshima dal finestrino di un tram.
Come vediamo in realtà? Possiamo immaginare di vedere qualcosa com’è in realtà senza il filtro della lastra di vetro, non solo i paesaggi naturali o urbani, ma anche che cosa pensa la gente? Come sono in realtà?
Il tram ripartì lentamente. Poco prima di sparire alla vista, il vecchio della bomba atomica sollevò la mano e la tenne sollevata.
Era un saluto, da uno straniero ad un altro. Un gesto che sembra suggerire che, alla fine, siamo tutti insieme esseri umani.
L’ultima notte, l’aria condizionata nella mia stanza dell’Hiroshima Green Hotel continuava a sbuffare senza alcuna efficacia e soffocai dal caldo fino al mattino. Quando mi svegliai il cuscino era zuppo e stranamente ricoperto di segni marrone e neri lasciati dal mio sudore.. Trascorsi l’ultima ora a Hiroshima tentando ripetutamente di lavare quelle orribili macchie dalla federa nel lavabo del bagno, ma non andarono via.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

La traduzione di un mito aborigeno

 

I Canti del Geco dalla Coda a Pomo 

Aldo Magagnino

Gecko

 

Mai, come nel caso della traduzione dei miti degli aborigeni australiani, appare in tutta la sua drammaticità il problema se si tratti, in realtà, di traduzione o di trasformazione. Le storie mitologiche degli aborigeni d’Australia hanno certamente subito notevoli manipolazioni nel corso del tempo, dal momento che sono più antiche dei più arcaici poemi occidentali. Molte sono andate perse dopo l’arrivo dei colonizzatori bianchi. Colin Johnson, lo scrittore aborigeno che è stato a lungo uno dei più attivi portavoce della cultura aborigena, autore di Wild Cat Falling, Writing from the Fringe e di Doctor Wooreddy’s Prescriptions for Enduring the End of the World, che dal 1988 ha mutato il proprio nome in Mudrooroo, ha scritto con amara ironia, “Quando i valorosi pionieri inglesi occuparono l’Australia, magari recando con sé una copia dell’Iliade in tasca, occuparono [la Terra nullius, la terra di nessuno: gli aborigeni erano nessuno] con grande spargimento di sangue e la catturarono come gli antichi greci catturarono e presero Troia. Chi conosce il canto di Troia o l’epica che i troiani cantavano? Si è persa, dimenticata … Al vincitore spettano le spoglie e questo è successo per l’Australia”. I racconti superstiti sono stati raccolti sul campo e tradotti/trasportati in altre lingue, dopo essere passati, naturalmente attraverso la lingua e la cultura inglese.

 

Mudrooroo003

Mudrooroo (Colin Johnson)

Le storie mitologiche aborigene si rifanno ad un periodo che precedette l’inizio del tempo, che viene definito il “Dreamtime, ” il Tempo del Sogno, o semplicemente “the Dreaming, ” il Sogno, o il “tempo della tradizione”, che ebbe inizio con le gesta dei mitici antenati totemici. Nella mitologia aborigena, il Sogno è un’epopea primordiale, che agli occidentali può apparire vaga e nebulosa, ma che per gli aborigeni è reale, nella quale gli uomini sono anche animali e gli animali sono anche uomini. Gli antenati potevano trasformarsi in uomini o animali a loro piacimento. In seguito alle straordinarie avventure, tramandate fino ai nostri giorni dalla “tradizione”, molti di loro si trasformarono definitivamente negli animali che oggi vediamo in Australia. Naturalmente, quando parliamo di tradizione, non intendiamo un insieme monolitico di leggende, miti e storie. La vastità stessa del territorio australiano, il fatto stesso che gli aborigeni discendano da popoli diversi, migrati in epoche successive e probabilmente da varie regioni dell’Asia, prima di disperdersi sul nuovo vasto continente australe, è incompatibile con questa visione. Tuttavia, alcuni temi sono ricorrenti. Il legame tra gli uomini e l’animale che prese forma dagli antichi antenati rimane saldissimo. Ogni aborigeno si identifica ancora oggi in un animale totemico e ne conosce il Sogno. Alcuni ritengono di essere essi stessi l’animale totemico. Con le sue gesta, l’antenato totemico ha, infatti, generato non solo il paesaggio, con le sue caratteristiche fisiche, ma ha anche dato vita alla tribù che popola quella terra.

“(Gli antenati) hanno percorso la terra, lasciando sul loro cammino i figli che generavano con le donne dei popoli che essi stessi avevano creato; infine avevano varcato il confine del territorio noto a quella particolare tribù ed erano ridiscesi nelle profondità della terra, oppure si erano trasformati in rocce, alberi o in qualche altra caratteristica naturale del paesaggio. Questi luoghi divennero centri dai quali gli spiriti individuali, che rappresentano quei particolari antenati, scaturirono per reincarnarsi in forma umana” (A. W. Reed, Aboriginal Myths, Reed New Holland, Sydney 1999, pagg. 50-55).

 

namarrgun[1]

L’uomo fulmine

Poiché si tratta di materiali ritrasmessi più volte nel corso dei millenni, per Anthony Pym non si può che concordare con Lévi-Strauss, secondo il quale, in questo caso, il valore dell’equazione traduttore/traditore è praticamente zero. Per questo motivo, non ci dovrebbe essere nulla di più facile che tradurre i miti, in quanto non esiste un autore unico che possa essere tradito. La fonte ultima del mito non è rintracciabile e qualunque versione giunta fino a noi è già la trasformazione di altre trasformazioni: nessun traduttore può, quindi, essere tacciato di essere in errore o infedele.
Tuttavia le cose non sono così semplici come a prima vista potrebbe apparire. Lo stesso Pym ci ricorda che Malinowski, per esempio, considera il mito come “la narrazione di un evento primordiale che stabilisce il precedente per un’istituzione”. Questo porterebbe a concludere che un mito può solo funzionare nel luogo sociale nel quale ha generato quell’istituzione. In luoghi diversi, il suo rapporto con la realtà si annulla e la traduzione è assimilabile alla trasposizione di un testo morto. Inoltre, non si può dimenticare il fatto che il mito è già di per sé una “traduzione” della realtà, un’interpretazione del mondo e dei suoi misteri e che il suo valore specifico è noto solo a pochi membri della tribù. Il possesso di questa conoscenza conferisce potere istituzionale. Un potere che verrebbe annullato dalla rivelazione pubblica del significato mitologico. In questo caso, l’interpretazione e la traduzione del testo mitologico in una lingua occidentale si configurerebbe non solo come un’appropriazione culturale ma anche come una profanazione.

Aboriginal_rock_art_on_the_Barnett_River,_Mount_Elizabeth_Station[1]     Pittografie aborigene nel Wunnumurra Gorge, Barnet River, Kimberley, Western Australia

Tutto questo sembrerebbe condurre, in qualche modo, alla conferma della teoria dell’intraducibilità di particolari testi, in particolare di quelli relativi a storie mitologiche, in quanto, pur esistendo la possibilità di trasferire i materiali narrativi rimane irrisolto il problema della trasferibilità dei valori relativi ad una certa cultura e ad una certa istituzione sociale. Tuttavia, anche i testi cosiddetti intraducibili sono tradotti e sono letti da lettori appartenenti ad aree culturali anche molto diverse da quella originale. Può darsi che il traduttore non riesca a far apprezzare fino in fondo allusioni, rimandi, allitterazioni, assonanze e quant’altro la lingua originale riusciva a veicolare ai membri di quella particolare cultura, ma rimane il fatto, come nota Umberto Eco in Dire Quasi la Stessa Cosa, che da millenni la gente traduce di tutto, compresi testi apparentemente impossibili come la Bibbia. Il fatto che biblisti, linguisti e teologi da secoli siano impegnati in discussioni sull’esatta interpretazione di diversi passaggi dei testi sacri, non ha impedito a tali testi di pervenire, attraverso i secoli, a miliardi di fedeli di lingue diverse, in una staffetta da una lingua all’altra. Non solo, ma, prosegue Eco, “una parte consistente dell’umanità si è trovata d’accordo sui fatti e sugli eventi fondamentali tramandati da questi testi, dai Dieci Comandamenti al Discorso della Montagna, dalle storie di Mosè alla passione di Cristo – e, vorrei dire, sullo spirito che anima quei testi.” Secondo Eco, la traduzione si fonda su alcuni processi di negoziazione, un processo nel corso del quale, per ottenere qualcosa, si rinuncia a qualcos’altro, ricercando un equilibrio che dia soddisfazione, che “renda giustizia”, alle due parti in causa.

Australia,_arte_aborigena,_john_mawurndjul,_serprente_arcobaleno_cornuto,_1991[1]Il Serpente Arcobaleno

A proposito della lingua nella quale il mito era originariamente raccontato, bisogna ricordare che le lingue parlate dagli aborigeni d’Australia sono un mondo a sé. Certamente non si tratta di lingue “primitive.” Al contrario, la loro complessità attesta la lunga evoluzione. Come tutte le lingue, anche quelle degli aborigeni sono funzionali alla cultura del popolo che le utilizza.

Macassan boat4

Imbarcazione di navigatori Macassan dipinta sulla parete di una caverna di Groote Eylandt, un’isola del Golfo di Carpentaria

Si calcola che, prima dell’arrivo dei bianchi, in Australia ci fossero circa settecento diverse unità tribali e che ognuna costituisse un popolo diverso. Questo spiega anche le varietà regionali dei miti, delle favole e delle leggende. In totale, le lingue parlate erano circa duecentocinquanta, alcune simili tra di loro, altre diverse come potrebbero esserlo il francese dall’inglese. Questo complesso sistema presenta una notevole diversità rispetto ai sistemi europei. Diversa è, per esempio, oltre alla struttura sintattica, l’organizzazione della frase. È evidente che le favole, così come noi le conosciamo, contengano, al di là della volontà dei curatori delle varie raccolte, un notevole grado di occidentalizzazione.
A. W. Reed, che ha pubblicato numerose raccolte di storie aborigene, afferma che ogni scrittore che si avventuri a raccontare i miti e le leggende aborigene deve necessariamente adottare uno stile ed una presentazione personali, riscrivendo i miti e i racconti popolari e apportando solo i cambiamenti necessari a renderli accettabili ai lettori dei nostri giorni. Reed non ha avuto la possibilità di raccogliere il materiale sul campo, ma ha utilizzato le ricerche di altri ricercatori, poeti e scrittori, tra i quali T. G. H. Strehlow e, in particolare, Roland Edward Robinson, un irlandese trapiantato in Australia in tenera età e che divenne una delle principali figure del movimento Jindyworobak, che tanta parte ha avuto nel diffondere tra i lettori australiani prima, e all’estero poi, la consapevolezza dell’unicità del patrimonio culturale dagli aborigeni d’Australia. In genere, i ricercatori avevano raccolto le storie direttamente dagli aborigeni, alcuni dei quali erano istruiti o semianalfabeti. Va ricordato che gli esponenti Jindyworobak non erano in genere antropologi, né archeologi o etnologi, ma poeti e letterati e che di natura squisitamente letteraria erano i loro fini.

Naturalmente, a prescindere dalla bontà della traduzione, è possibile che, per altri versi, il significato risulti poco chiaro, poiché la matrice originaria dalla quale il testo emerge non è conosciuta in modo approfondito.
Bisognerà sempre tener presente che i racconti, che si rifanno alle songlines, erano originariamente in versi, come i poemi omerici, e la cadenza con la quale venivano raccontati contribuiva a far balzare davanti agli occhi le immagini della terra d’Australia. Il ritmo e la danza erano parte essenziale della narrazione.

fc,220x200,black[1]

Si vedano, per esempio le trasformazioni subite dai “Canti del Geco dalla Coda a Pomo”, nei passaggi dal testo originale aborigeno alla traslitterazione e traduzione inglese. Si tratta, di fatto, di una doppia traduzione: una, per così dire endolinguistica, con il passaggio dalla lingua orale aborigena ad una lingua aborigena scritta, anche se attraverso la mediazione di un codice europeo come l’uso di un alfabeto scritto, del tutto sconosciuto agli aborigeni, e una traduzione interlinguistica, dalla lingua aborigena alla/e lingua/e europea/e. I canti fanno parte di una raccolta curata da M. Duwell e R. M. W. Dixon, Little Eva at Moonlight Creek (University of Queensland Press, St. Lucia 1994).
Al testo aborigeno era stato aggiunto un commento in inglese, in sostituzione probabilmente di quelle parti del mito veicolate dal ritmo della musica e dai movimenti della danza, ottenendo un racconto che segue i canoni della cultura occidentale, ma che allo stesso tempo riesce ad evitare una completa colonizzazione del testo originario da parte della lingua d’arrivo. Siamo, quindi, anche di fronte ad una traduzione intersemiotica.

 

 

I CANTI DEL GECO DALLA CODA A POMO

(Tyárlara tyárlara ruté)

1. Yadná wuRadí pantaná yádnalpántaná
Yadná wuRadí pantaná.

The Sandhill Lizard, Wakultyuru, was in the fire at the Kudnara camp. He had tried to protect himself with his shield but it was burnt. His skin peeled off. Lying among the ashes he sang this verse.

2. Yadnál’ pantaná yadná linthityá
Linthítyarará.
Yadná warará yadná linthityá.

It must have been the day after: he slowly came back to life amid the ashes. He was not yet a Knob-tailed Gecko. He was Wakultyuru, that is a lizard in the sandhill contry. You see him anywhere: he is brown with a big head and a long tail. His burns have made him look different: he was to turn into a Knob-tailed Gecko called Mayipalkuru or Tyarla-tyarla.

3. Linthítyálarái yadnáwararái
Yadná linthityá.

He remained there, he just lay there flat after the fire, not looking anywhere. He lay there and went on lying there. Not that he was sleeping: he was as if dead!

4. Yanpá láthuká yatú pantaná
Yadná wuRa
Yanpá láthuká yatú pantaná
Yadná wuRalí.

He managed to look up and he saw his own camp: it had been burnt.

5. Mákulyé kulyákulyáidna
Makudnhái tyar’ímpirái.

He gradually recovered enough strength to move. He named himself in a verse. Then he turned the verse around.

5a. Tyar’ímparáta ma kudnhá
Mákulyá kulyáidna
Má kudnái tyar’ímpará
(half sung)
Uta thurkaná!

And he arose from the dead.

6. Língwetyengwé, pályalya língwetyengwé
Pályalya waridity’ amánta língwemantá.

This is how he set up and he looked around close by to decide in which direction and which way should go.

7. Kantireí yályara Rambálkulyanái
Kánti lyalyayará Rambálkulyanái,
MáRara wílpilminé.

He went looking for somewhere to camp but the country alla round was already in twilight. The sun set. He was looking for a windbreak, for a bit of mulga to break off to make a shelter. Everything had been burnt by the fire. “Where can I go to settle down among some mulga trees?”
He went on. There was a mulga tree in a swamp, a mulga tree! The swamp had not been burnt, and there was a tree standing there, alive. He spent the night by the mulga tree and travelled further southwest into the desert the next day.

8. Pántu Mirláka wára kampíne
Rítyampirlá kawára kampíne.

He saw the saltlake Milaka then and named it in his song.

9. Purlká nhintya láwurú purlká nhintya
Láwurú lithírkithirké
Purlká nhintya láwurú.

He was still so ill as the fire had burnt his stomach. As he was looking at the lake he turned into a Knob-tailed Gecko, because he had been burnt by the fire. He saw that on the other side of the saltlake, there lay a huge sandhill. He went up on top and looked around the area. He was looking for a place. Where could he go down below the ground to rest for good? He was still sick from having been burnt by the fire, and his tail had dropped off.

9a. Purlká nhintya láwurú lithírkithirké
Purlká nhintya láwurú lithírkithirké.
10. Tyárlara tyárlara ruté
Ya tyárlara tyárlara rut’
Yadngadnámpa kákyara runté.
10a. Yadnadnámpa kalyáRa luntáyi
Yadnadnámpa kalyáRa luntáyi
Yátyalára tyarlára luntáyi
Yátyalára tyarlára luntáyi
Yadnadnámpa kalyáRa luntáyi.

At last he found a place to camp. He went to lie down below the ground, he dug himself below the ground, he then pronounced a curse, a magic spell at the place. (The singer does not include the spell, which he describes as having been given to him by his father. It refers to what had happened to the Gecko. It could only be directed against men.)

banded_knob_tailed_gecko[1]

 

Quella che segue è invece la traduzione in inglese del solo testo aborigeno.

1. To ashes the fire burnt down, to ashes it burnt,
To ashes the fire burnt down.
2. To ashes all burnt down, in ashes he lies,
He lies.
To ashes, not seeing in ashes he lies.
3. Lying in the ashes not seeing
Lying in the ashes.
4. The fire-brand burnt it.
Ashes, the fire!
The fire-brand burnt it.
Ashes, the fire.

5. Akilyawa he calls himself, the Aranda
name for “dragon lizard.
He looks at his bare bones and leaves
his burnt camp.
5a. He leaves his burnt camp, he looks at his bare bones
He calls himself Akilyawa,
He looks at his bare bones and leaves his burnt camp.
(half sung)
Now arise!

6. It was evening, twilight, evening
Twilight, and the mulga was burnt, it was evening.
7. He picks up sticks,
He picks up sticks,
With his hands he builds a humpy.
8. The saltlake Mirlaka is there, it glistens,
He makes a noise as he vomits, it glistens.
9. He sees he has turned greyish white, there he sees he is greyish white,
There lies his tail. When he scratches himself it falls apart.
He sees he has turned greyish white, there.
9a. He sees he has turned greyish white, somewhere, when he scratches himself,
He sees he has turned greyish white, somewhere, when he scratches himself.
10. I am the Knob-tailed Gecko, the Knob-tailed Gecko,
I am the Knob-tailed Gecko, the Knob-tailed Gecko.
My body I bury below.
10a. My body I bury below
My body I bury below.
I am the Knob-tailed Gecko, the Knob-tailed Gecko,
I am the Knob-tailed Gecko, the Knob-tailed Gecko.
My body I bury below.

 

banded_knob_tailed_gecko[1]

 

A questo punto proponiamo la traduzione in italiano della versione inglese e del commento aggiunto in inglese al testo originario aborigeno. Il commento era stato fornito, in lingua originale, a Duwell e Dixon da Mick McLean Irinyili, discendente della gente Wangkangurru, un popolo di lingua Aranda, diffusa, con numerosi dialetti, in tutta l’Australia centrale, specialmente lungo il Finke River e nel Deserto di Simpson. Il canto prende le mosse dal Grande Incendio Ancestrale che prese inizio proprio nella regione degli Aranda e si spostò verso nord-est. Narra le vicende di un mitico antenato, il quale diede origine al sogno di questo animale totemico.

I Canti del Geco dalla Coda a Pomo

1. In cenere il fuoco bruciò, in cenere bruciò,
In cenere il fuoco bruciò.

La Lucertola delle Dune, Wakultyuru, era nel fuoco al campo Kudnara. Egli tentò di proteggersi col suo scudo, ma lo scudo si bruciò. La sua pelle si staccò. Mentre giaceva nella cenere cantò questo verso.

2. Tutto bruciò in cenere, nella cenere egli giace
Egli giace
In cenere, senza più vedere nella cenere giace.

Sarà stato il giorno dopo: ritornò lentamente alla vita tra la cenere. Non era ancora un Geco dalla Coda a Pomo. Era Wakultyuru, cioè una lucertola delle regioni delle dune sabbiose. Lo si può vedere dappertutto: è marrone con una grossa testa e la coda lunga. Le ustioni lo hanno fatto sembrare diverso: si sarebbe trasformato in un Geco dalla Coda a Pomo chiamato Mayipalkuru o Tyarla-tyarla.

3. Giace nella cenere senza vedere,
Giace nella cenere.

Rimase là,se ne stette appiattito dopo l’incendio, senza guardare da nessuna parte. Se ne stette disteso e continuò a restare disteso. Non che dormisse: era come morto.

4. Il tizzone ardente lo bruciò. Cenere, il fuoco!
Il tizzone ardente lo bruciò. Cenere, il fuoco!

Riuscì a guardare in su e vide il proprio campo; era stato bruciato.

5. Akilyawa chiama se stesso, il nome Aranda che indica la “lucertola drago”
Guarda le sue ossa nude e abbandona il suo campo bruciato.

Gradualmente recuperò abbastanza forza per muoversi. Diede a se stesso il nome con un verso. E girò il verso intorno.

5a. Egli abbandona il suo campo bruciato, guarda le sue ossa nude
Chiama se stesso Akilyawa,
Guarda le sue ossa nude e abbandona il suo campo bruciato.
(mezzo cantato)
Ora alzati!

E si levò dal morto.

6. Era sera, crepuscolo, sera
Crepuscolo e il mulga era bruciato, era sera.

Ecco come partì e si guardò intorno attentamente per decidere in quale direzione e da che parte andare.

7. Raccoglie ramoscelli,
Raccoglie ramoscelli,
Con le mani costruisce un riparo.

Continuò a cercare un posto dove accamparsi ma la campagna intorno era già nel crepuscolo. Il sole tramontò. Cercava un frangivento, un po’ di rami d’acacia mulga per farsi un riparo. Tutto era stato bruciato dal fuoco. “Dove posso andare a riposare tra qualche albero di mulga?”
Andò avanti. C’era un albero di mulga nella palude, un albero di mulga! La palude non era bruciata e l’albero era rimasto in piedi, vivo. Trascorse la notte sotto l’albero di mulga e il giorno dopo si si spinse ancora più a sud-ovest, nel deserto.

8. Il lago salato Mirkala è laggiù, risplende,
Egli produce un rumore mentre vomita, risplende.

Allora vide il lago salato Mirlaka e lo nominò nel suo canto.

9. Si accorge di essere diventato bianco grigiastro, là si accorge
di essere diventato bianco grigiastro.
Là giace la sua coda. Mentre si gratta essa si stacca.
Si accorge di essere diventato bianco grigiastro, là.

Era ancora molto ammalato, poiché il fuoco gli aveva bruciato lo stomaco. Mentre guardava il lago si trasformò in un Geco dalla Coda a Pomo poiché era stato bruciato dal fuoco. Vide che dall’altra parte del lago, non lontano dalla riva, c’era una grande duna di sabbia. Raggiunse la sommità e osservò l’area circostante. Cercava un posto. Dove poteva nascondersi sottoterra e riposare in pace? Era ancora sofferente per il fuoco e la coda si era staccata.

9a. Si accorge di essere diventato bianco grigiastro, da qualche parte,
quando si gratta,
Si accorge di essere diventato bianco grigiastro, da qualche parte,
quando si gratta.
10. Sono il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo, il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo,
Sono il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo, il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo.
Nascondo il mio corpo sottoterra.
10a. Nascondo il mio corpo sottoterra,
Nascondo il mio corpo sottoterra.
Sono il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo, il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo,
Sono il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo, il Geco dalla Coda a Pomo.
Nascondo il mio corpo sottoterra.

Infine trovò un posto per accamparsi. Andò a stendersi sottoterra, si scavò un rifugio sottoterra, poi pronunciò una maledizione, una formula magica per quel posto. (Il cantore non rivela la maledizione che, afferma, gli è stata rivelata dal padre. Si riferisce a ciò che era accaduto al Geco. Può essere rivolta solo contro un uomo.)

 

Risulta evidente che la prima cosa che si perde, nella traduzione di un mito che originariamente era raccontato in versi è, come qualcuno ha acutamente notato, la voce, la tonalità originaria. Tentare di mantenere la tonalità di un racconto è sempre la cosa più difficile per ogni traduzione. Le lingue degli aborigeni posseggono una straordinaria musicalità, data dalla possibilità di realizzare straordinari effetti sonori mediante il gioco delle ripetizioni delle allitterazioni e delle assonanze, che evaporano completamente nel processo di traduzione. Inoltre, i canti, che erano legati spesso a cerimonie sacre, riti di iniziazione o propiziatori, erano accompagnati dal fragore prodotto dal battito ritmico dei boomerang, dei bastoni, delle mani e dal cupo suono del didjeridoo. Non è più possibile recuperare la musicalità originaria, specialmente per il fatto che quelle storie, in gran parte sono giunte a noi attraverso la mediazione di una terza lingua. Tuttavia si potrebbe tentare di farlo con quelle che sono sopravvissute anche nella versione originale.
Pare che W. B. Yates, si facesse leggere il testo poetico che intendeva tradurre in inglese da un madrelingua, il quale poi lo aiutava a trovare l’esatto equivalente inglese di ogni termine. A questo punto cominciava ad elaborare il testo che aveva prodotto cercando di imitare la musicalità originaria. È quasi come suonare la stessa musica con uno strumento diverso da quello per il quale era stata scritta. Solo che è un po’ più difficile, ma è un’avventura affascinante.

 

fc,220x200,army[1]

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

THE RABBI CAME …

Aldo Magagnino

Long ago, in July 1989, I went visiting some friends of mine, the Flemish sculptor Norman Mommens and his wife, the British writer Patience Gray. They were in their sixties and had been living in this part of Italy, Salento, at the very tip of the heel of the boot, not far from Santa Maria di Leuca, since the 1970s. They had bought and roughly restored a 17th century farmstead on the top of Spigolizzi, one the low hills that are called the Serre Salentine, and had chosen to live there, with no electricity. Two solar panels provided enough energy to operate the water pump and two small lamps: one in Patience’s studio, where she spent hours ticking her Olivetti 22, and one in the cellar, where they kept their own-produced legendary red wine. For the rest, illumination was provided by Aladdin kerosene mantle lamps. Of course there was no television, no fridge, no central heating, no telephone. Patience would tune her battery-operated radio on the BBC World Service from time to time, or she would play a cassette of classical music. I remember giving her a copy of Nozze di Figaro once, to her delight. Twice a week they would come down from the hill in the countryside to do some shopping at the market in the village and to buy La Repubblica. And of course they received papers, letters and books from Britain and from half of the rest of the world.

Norman was sad that evening and Patience, always eager to talk, was strangely silent. Their friend Arno, a German Jew who lived in a nearby farmstead with his British wife Helen, was dying of cancer. He was already in his eighties and had fled to Spain during the Holocaust and then migrated to Uruguay. But Norman was particularly sad because he had the impression that Arno could not die yet, not without something that he seemed to be waiting for, maybe. Not that Arno was conscious of it, he was quite confused most of the time and had difficulties in speaking at times. But Norman had the impression that he was lingering in is suffering, as if he were not ready yet to depart. “Maybe he should talk to someone of his religion – he said – maybe a rabbi”. “Yes, darling – said Patience in her dark sweet voice – the perennial cigarette burning between her fingers – but where are we to find a rabbi in Salento?” I thought about it, sipping a glass of red wine emanating dark ruby reflections under the light of the lamp placed on the marble-topped table. “I could try – I said – maybe I can find someone in Naples or Rome, where there are large Jewish communities”. Norman and Patience looked at each other, smiling.

In the morning I woke up early and phoned the telephone company to ask for the phone numbers of the nearest Jewish Community offices, namely in Rome and Naples. The operator told me there was no Jewish community listed in Bari. I tried Naples first, but they took on a bureaucratic approach: they told me that the man was not included in their lists and there was nothing they could do. So I tried Rome. The man at the switchboard listened carefully to my story, then he told me .”Maybe it’s better for you to talk directly to rabbi Elio Toaf”. I was so surprised that it could be so easy to talk to the most eminent member, not only of the Roman Jewish community but of the Italian Jewish community. Elio Toaf was the Italian Chief Rabbi. I had seen hism so many times on television, in interviews and in various programmes. I had seen the pictures of his meeting with Pope Wojtyla in Rome. He was extraordinarily famous and, of course, extraordinarily busy.

A few seconds later I heard his voice at the other end: “Hello, I am Elio Toaf.” Simple as that. Has anyone tried to talk to an Italian Catholic Archbishop? I explained once again the case. When I finished, no sound came from the other end, so I said, “Hello, are you still there?” “Yes, – the rabbi answered – I am here. I was just thinking that in a world where bursts of anti-Semitism are still so violent and frequent, it is incredible that there are people who worry and go into so much trouble about the death of an old Jew. I’ll send down one of my rabbis. I’ll pass him your contacts. Thank you so much.”

I could not believe it could be so easy. The following morning I rushed up to Spigolizzi to announce the good news. Norman was so happy and Patience, the grand-daughter of a Polish rabbi migrated to Britain during a pogrom, was thrilled at the idea of receiving a rabbi at Spigolizzi.

The rabbi arrived early in the morning at Brindisi airport and I went to collect him. Of course I did not know the rabbi and I was expecting to see someone wearing a kippah or a black hat or some other item that could help me identify him. But no one of the passengers at the arrivals hall looked like a rabbi to me. I waited until most of them left the airport and when the last 5 passengers were about to go out on the footpath to queue up for the bus to Lecce, I started going round asking: “Excuse me, are you the rabbi I was waiting for?” From the puzzled faces of the first two gentlemen I understood they had never heard of a rabbi, and a rabbi coming to Salento, of all places. However they were very kind, though they kept exchanging alarmed glances as I proceeded on my quest. The third gentleman was my rabbi. I was so happy, we shook hands and then I took the luggage near the rabbi’s feet and started walking with him towards the glass sliding doors at the exit. But before we got there someone behind us started yelling: “Hey, that’s my luggage!” I froze and when I looked back I saw a man running towards me and two policemen approaching. I explained that the luggage was the rabbi’s and then, overcome by doubt, I asked: “Because you are a rabbi, aren’t you?”. And it was then that the rabbi opened his lips for the second time, to say that, yes, he was my rabbi, but had no luggage. I apologized with the legitimate owner and the policemen for the inconvenience, of course it was a misunderstanding and all that, while the policemen patiently listened, nodding their head, as if to say “don’t you dare do that again in my airport, mate!”

While driving to Arno’s place, I tried to think up of a plan of action. I had told in advance about the visit of the rabbi to Helen receiving a perplexed look. She was a convinced atheist and was not sure that Arno could talk to the rabbi, or to anyone else for that matter, since his conditions were rapidly deteriorating. And of course, though she did not say it, she considered the whole thing a nonsense. I had to explain the situation to my rabbi, including another fact, a lie actually: I had told Helen that the rabbi was just visiting Salento and, having learned that an old Jew lived here, had asked to visit him. The rabbi was very understanding.

When we got to Arno’s place, Helen received us with cold kindness and led us directly to Arno’s room. Arno was reclining on an armchair, wearing a pair of brown trousers, a shirt and a brown waistcoat.  A light cotton blanket was on his legs, despite the sweltering heat. He was looking tired and emaciated. And the problems began. Arno, who could speak several languages, including German, Italian, French, English and Spanish, had been refusing for days to speak any language but German. I could Speak all his languages except German and the rabbi could only speak Italian and French. Helen, who could have helped us in German had disappeared and had clearly no intention of cooperating. We tried to start a conversation in Italian, English, French and Spanish, but only managed to extract a few indistinct words form Arno. But he had understood that his visitor was a rabbi and he asked in English “Why aren’t you wearing a kippah, then?” I translated for the rabbi and he took his kippah, that he kept neatly folded in his pocket and put it on his head, saying a few words in Yiddish. Arno’s eyes shone for a moment and he answered in the same language. They kept speaking that ancient language of the Jew, I could not understand a single word, but that was not important. My presence was no longer needed. Silently, I left the room and went out in the garden.

About forty minutes later, my rabbi reappeared, escorted out by Helen, She smiled, shook hands and retreated. I drove the rabbi to Spigolizzi where Patience had prepared a kosher lunch. But the rabbi could not linger, he had some business in Brindisi before departing on an evening flight to Rome. We sat down under the giant fig tree just outside the house for some time and the rabbi said how moving his meeting with Arno had been. They had prayed and sung together and he had left Arno peacefully sleeping. Before we left, Norman managed to slip an envelope with an offer for the Jewish community, and a note to thank  Chief Rabbi Elio Toaf in Rome, into the rabbi’s hands.

Under a fierce afternoon sun I drove the rabbi to Brindisi again and then came back to Spigolizzi, where Patience, Norman and I ate the kosher food  lunch for dinner.

Arno died the day after.

Some German friends criticized the initiative, saying that it was a sort of intrusion into Arno’s life  and an imposition on Helen. They said that the Jews do not have an end-of-the-life rite as the Christians do. Patience listened silently and then placidly answered with her usual enigmatic smile: “But the rabbi has come.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A PASQUA, UN ANGELO È VOLATO IN CIELO

Per tre anni ho insegnato inglese ad una bambina cieca chiamata Gabriella. Era una bambina straordinaria e sono sicuro che sono state più le cose che ho imparato da lei che quelle che lei ha imparato da me. Per tre anni le sue dita che scorrevano sicure e veloci sui grandi fogli di speciale cartoncino bianco, ricoperti dei puntini del Braille mi hanno affascinato ed emozionato. La sua voce ferma trasformava in suoni precisi quelle sensazioni tattili che i polpastrelli catturavano. Con la sua dattiloBraille, la macchina da scrivere per i non vedenti, aveva imparato a produrre testi con la velocità di una dattilografa. Gabriella sapeva anche disegnare. Con una biro esausta, che utilizzava a mo’ di punteruolo, eseguiva il disegno su un cartoncino o un foglio di acetato, poi capovolgeva il foglio e il disegno compariva in rilievo. Sembrava lavorato a sbalzo. Ma aveva anche una straordinaria manualità. Erano innumerevoli le cose che sapeva creare con la carta e il cartoncino: scatoline portaoggetti, fiori, segnalibro, tanti piccoli e delicati oggetti che regalava agli amici, ai compagni di classe, agli insegnanti, a tutti.

Una volta venne a scuola a trovarci un mio amico australiano, il poeta Paul Sherman. Ci regalò una poesia appositamente scritta per noi e con i ragazzi la traducemmo. Per una meravigliosa coincidenza, era la storia di un coccodrillo cieco. Naturalmente, Paul era del tutto ignaro che nella nostra scuola avrebbe incontrato una bambina non vedente.

THE MANGROVE MAN CROCODILE FILE

by Paul Sherman

Stay away from the creek when the moon is full

And the high tide fills the deep salt pool

Stay away from the creek, or you might see

The mangrove man step out of his tree.

                   Mangrove leaves in his matted hair

                   Mouth gaped wide in a grisly grin

                   Don’t trust that grin – beware, beware

The Mangrove Man with his stinking skin.

Beware his step, beware his smile

As he guides Shoo Ko the Crocodile.

Shoo Ko the Crocodile big and strong

From tooth to tail he’s many feet long.

                   More cunning and crafty you’d never find

                   But Shoo Ko the Crocodile, he’s blind.

                   He lost his eyes in a deadly fight

                   When a rival Crocodile challenged his right

To share the depth of the deep salt pool

Where Shoo Ko swims when the moon is full.

Ever since he was first full-grown

He’d kept that pool as his very own.

                   Long and hard in the mangrove jungle

                   Those crocs were locked in a deadly struggle

                   With no holds barred and never a pause

                   Of those lashing tails and clashing jaws.

But though Shoo Ko was winner of the fight

He paid for his win by losing his sight.

His eyes were mangled so, since that day,

Wherever he goes he must smell his way.

                   But he made a mate of the Mangrove Man

And he follows him wherever he can.

The Mangrove Man, a big lantern he holds

As he plods through the muddy folds.

So on full moon nights, if you hear a scream

That wakes you out of your sleep or dream

Stay away from the creek, or else you’ll see

The Mangrove Man slide out of his tree.

                   In his hairy hands his lantern he holds

                   As he plods along through the muddy folds

                   Of the Mangrove Creek, mile after mile

                   Guiding Shoo Ko, the Crocodile

IL RACCONTO DEL COCCODRILLO E DELL’UOMO MANGROVIA

di Paul Sherman

Al ruscello non ti avvicinare

Se l’alta marea sta per avanzare

Poiché riempie le pozze salate ad una ad una

Non appena è piena la luna

Al ruscello non ti avvicinare

L’uomo Mangrovia potresti incontrare.

Ha foglie nei capelli e bocca spaventosa

Il ghigno feroce terrorizza ogni cosa.

Non fidarti di lui, non fidarti per niente

Lui è l’Uomo Mangrovia dalla pelle puzzolente.

Attenti al suo sorriso ed al suo passo

Mentre guida il coccodrillo grasso

Grande e forte è Shoo Ko

Molto più lungo di un bambù

Più astuto e ingegnoso non lo troverai

Ma Shoo Ko il Coccodrillo non vedrà mai

Lui perse i suoi occhi in un combattimento mortale

Quando sfidò per il suo diritto il coccodrillo rivale

Di  condividere le profondità delle pozze profonde e salate

Dove Shoo ko nuota a bracciate.

Da quando era diventato grande

Considerava sue quelle lande.

Nella giungla di mangrovia a lungo e furiosamente

Quei coccodrilli si impegnarono mortalmente.

Di colpi bassi ne sferrarono tanti

Con le code e le mascelle saettanti.

Ma anche se Shoo Ko la posta conquista

Paga la sua vittoria con la vista.

Ebbe gli occhi stritolati

E dovunque vada da quel giorno

Deve annusare la strada tutto intorno.

Ma con l’Uomo Mangrovia ha fatto conoscenza

E della sua compagnia non può più far senza.

L’Uomo Mangrovia regge una lanterna grande

Mentre avanza tra le fangose lande.

Così se un grido nella notte ti sveglia forte

E dal sogno al mondo ti fa tornare

Se dal ruscello lontano starai

L’Uomo Mangrovia non vedrai.

L’Uomo Mangrovia con la mano pelosa

Regge una lanterna grandiosa,

mentre avanza sul terreno fangoso miglio dopo miglio

guidando Shoo Ko il Coccodrillo.[1]

Fu un lavoro, più che collettivo, corale, e che ci divertì tantissimo. Gabriella partecipò col suo solito entusiasmo e cercò anche di disegnare il coccodrillo, in base alla descrizione che aveva sentito. Ne venne fuori, naturalmente, un animale un po’ strano, ma il giorno dopo i compagni portarono a scuola dei coccodrilli di plastica e Gabriella li accarezzò per qualche minuto, poi si mise al lavoro e il risultato fu straordinario.

Paul Sherman ne fu sbalordito e si commosse quando Gabriella volle regalarglielo. Paul ha ancora con sé in Australia, a Brisbane, nello stato del Queensland, quel disegno e spera di poterlo regalare un giorno ad una scuola per bambini ciechi.

Gabriella non è più tra noi. Poco prima di Pasqua è volata in cielo. Ora è un angelo del Paradiso e ci vede benissimo e sarà stata contenta di constatare che i coccodrilli non sono per nulla diversi da quello che aveva disegnato a scuola. Paul, il nostro amico dal grande cuore, ha voluto dedicarle questa poesia.

 

GABRIELLA’S GIFT

Dear Gabriella’s deft fingers spun my sounds to shape.

She printed out my poem, paving in Braille

my story of the Mangrove Man who led

the blinded crocodile through tidal swamps

in Northern Queensland’s salty creek

remote form Gabriella’s own costal school

In Southern Italy’s Gallipoli.

 

Four years have flown since Gabriella

gave me my fingered transcript of my poem.

She shaped the sounds, she even outlined clear

my storied, wearied, blinded crocodile.

And now, I know, I call you, Gabriella

a poet too. Your teacher’s sent me news.

You land-life’s over now, dear gentle girl.

This morning out I took the gift you gave

– my poem transposed, your mute memorial.

                            

Paul Sherman                Wooloowin, Queensland            March, 2010

 

 

IL DONO DI GABRIELLA

 

Le agili dita della cara Gabriella crearono forme dai miei suoni.

Stampò la mia poesia, scolpendo in Braille

la storia dell’Uomo Mangrovia che guidava

Il coccodrillo cieco fra le paludi marine

negli acquitrini salati nel Queensland del nord

lontani dalla scuola di Gabriella, vicina a un altro mare,

quello di Gallipoli, nell’Italia del sud.

 

Quattro anni son volati da quando Gabriella

mi regalò la mia poesia da lei trascritta e digitata.

Diede forma ai suoni, disegnò con cura perfino

il coccodrillo cieco e stanco del racconto.

Ed ora, lo so, sei anche tu, Gabriella,

 un poeta. Il tuo maestro mi ha dato ora la notizia

che la tua vita sulla terra è terminata, cara dolce ragazza.

Stamattina ho ritrovato il dono che mi desti

– la mia poesia trasposta, il tuo muto monumento.[2]

 

Paul Sherman                Wooloowin, Queensland  Marzo, 2010


[1] (Trad. a cura degli alunni della classe IIB dell’IC POLO 2 Gallipoli, A.S. 2006/2007, la classe di Gabriella; la traduzione è stata pubblicata in un articolo su Lang Matters, No. 16, March 2008)

[2] (Trad. Aldo Magagnino) 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment